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[From the London Evening Star, May 2, 1865.]

The body of the President was borne into the rotunda, where Dr. Gurley completed the religious exercises of the occasion. Here the remains rested, exposed to public view, but guarded by soldiery, until the next day. Thousands who had had no other opportunity to take their farewell of the beloved dust thronged the Capitol all night. The pageant of the day, in many of its aspects, was never paralleled upon this continent. Nothing like it--nothing approaching it--had ever occurred in this country, if indeed, in the world.

While these funeral services and ceremonies were in progress in Washington, similar ceremonies were observed in every part of the country. Churches were thrown open, where prayer and sermon and music united in the expression of affection for the dead, and lamentation for the national loss. Great public gatherings were held, in which the memory of the good President was celebrated in impulsive speech or studied eulogy.

The whole nation suspended its business, and gave itself up to the mournful services and associations of the day. Never had such a funeral been given to a national ruler. Never had died a man who received such testimonials of universal affection and grief. A whole nation mourned its dead. One thought enthralled every heart--the thought of a great, good man--the father of his people--cruelly murdered; and all animosities were overwhelmed in the general grief.

All detraction was hushed; and every heart that had done him wrong, made its amends to his memory, and won peace for itself, by awarding to him his just meed of praise. As there was never such a funeral as this, so there was never such a procession. That which moved from the White House, on the nineteenth, was but the beginning of a pageant that displayed its marvelous numbers and its ever-varying forms, through country, and village, and city, winding across the territories of vast states, along a track of more than fifteen hundred miles.

The President was to be borne back to his own people, and to be buried among the scenes of his early life. He had told the people of Springfield, Illinois, when he parted with them, more than four years before, that he owed to them all that he was. It was but right that they should have his dust.

On the twenty-first, the funeral train left Washington, amid the silent grief of thousands who had gathered to witness its departure. With the coffin which contained the remains of the President, went back to the western home the coffin which contained the dust of his beloved Willie, whose death has already been mentioned; and father and son, in the touching companionship of death, traveled together the long journey. At ten o'clock, the train reached Baltimore. The immense crowd that had assembled here to pay their last tribute of respect to the departed President, was full of its suggestions of the change which four years had wrought upon the city.

It seemed incredible that this was the city through which the living President had so lately passed, in fear of the fate which had at last overtaken him. Nothing that the ingenuity of grief could devise was left undone to make the return passage an imposing testimonial to his memory. The display of military was large; and all the ceremonies of the occasion were such as did honor, alike to the people of the city, and to the man they mourned. In the afternoon, the train moved for Harrisburg, but not until a multitude had improved the opportunity to obtain a view of the pale, dead face of their friend.

On the way, new mourners were taken on; and at every considerable station people had gathered to see the solemn pageant sweep by. At York, six ladies came into the car, and deposited upon the coffin an exquisite wreath of flowers, while all who witnessed the affectionate tribute were moved to tears. Bells were tolled, and bands breathed forth their plaintive music, at every village. The funeral obsequies at Harrisburg were observed in the evening. Until midnight, the people crowded into the State Capitol, to obtain a view of the remains; and, from seven to nine on the following morning, the catafalque was surrounded by the anxious throngs that had come in from all the country round, for the purpose.

At this place, as at all the places on the route, there were new pall-bearers, new processions, and new expressions of the popular grief. A very large procession accompanied the remains to the cars; and from Harrisburg to Philadelphia the funeral train moved through crowds of people, assembled at every convenient point. For several miles before the train reached Philadelphia, both sides of the railway were occupied by almost continuous lines of men, women, and children, who stood with uncovered heads as the train passed them. Philadelphia was draped with mourning, to give a fitting reception to the honored dead.

The streets were filled with people, long before the funeral train arrived; and cannon thundered forth the announcement of its coming. All that ingenuity, aided by abundant means, could do, to make the fresh pageant a worthy one, was done. A new hearse had been built, and this was drawn by eight splendid black horses, in silver-mounted harnesses. The procession itself was composed of eleven divisions, and was one of the most remarkable, in every respect, with which the remains of the President were honored during their long passage to their resting-place.

What place more fit for the brief sojourn of these remains than Independence Hall, intimately associated, as it was, with the principles which the sleeping patriot had faithfully defended, and still echoing to the ear of sorrowing affection with the sound of his living voice? To this hall he was borne, amid the tears of a vast multitude. The hall was literally filled with the most exquisite flowers. From ten o'clock until midnight, the people had the opportunity to view the remains of their beloved chief magistrate. Then the doors were closed; but hundreds remained around the building all night, that they might be first in the morning.

The following day was Sunday, and from six o'clock in the morning until one o'clock on Monday morning, during which the remains were exposed to view, a dense, unbroken stream of men, women, and children, pressed into and out of the building.

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The Philadelphia Inquirer, in its report of the occasion, said: "Never before in the history of our city was such a dense mass of humanity huddled together. Hundreds of persons were seriously injured, from being pressed in the mob; and many fainting females were extricated by the police and military, and conveyed to places of security. At one o'clock, on Monday morning, the procession recommenced its march, bearing the body to Kensington Station, which was left at four, for the passage to New York.

Bells were tolled, mottoes were displayed, minute-guns were fired, and the people were gathered at the various stations along the entire passage through New Jersey. It seemed as if the whole state had come to the railroad line, simply to witness the passage of the funeral train. It is bewildering to read the accounts of the ceremonies at New York, and impracticable to reproduce them. The passage of the beloved remains into and through the great city, and the interval of their brief rest while they lay in state in the City Hall, were marked at every stage by some new and impressive expression of the public grief.

Minute-guns, tolling bells, requiems by choirs of singers, dirges by bands of musicians, military and civic displays, suspended business, draped flags, and shrouded private and public buildings, all mingled their testimony to the universal sorrow, and the common wish to do justice and honor to a hallowed memory.

Every street and avenue around the City Hall was filled with people. The first line formed for viewing the remains was three quarters of a mile long, and reached far up the Bowery. From the moment when the coffin-lid was removed, until nearly noon on the following day, through all the long night, the people pressed into the hall, caught a hasty glimpse of the beloved features, and then retired; until it was estimated that one hundred and fifty thousand persons had gained their object, while it was evident that twice that number had failed to win the patiently awaited vision.

The military procession which accompanied the remains to the depot of the Hudson River Railroad was the most remarkable ever witnessed in the city, numbering fully fifteen thousand troops. The carriages in the procession were filled with federal and state dignitaries, and representatives of foreign governments in full court costume; and the line of the procession was thronged from the beginning to the end by crowding multitudes of spectators. The New York Herald's report says: "The people, with tearful eyes, under the shadow of the great affliction, watched patiently and unmurmuringly the moving of the honored dead and the mournful procession, and silently breathed over them the most heartfelt and fervent prayers Such an occasion, such a crowd, and such a day, New York may never see again.

At a quarter past four, on the afternoon of the twenty-fifth, the train which bore the funeral party from New York left the station, drawn by the "Union," the same locomotive that brought Mr. Lincoln to New York, on his passage to Washington, more than four years previously. The train passed to Albany without stopping, except at Poughkeepsie, where a delegation from the city government of Albany was taken on board; but the people were gathered at every point to witness the passage. Mottoes were displayed, draped flags floated everywhere, and all along the route stood the silent crowds, with heads uncovered, as the train which bore the martyred President swept by.

It was nearly midnight when Albany was reached; and it was not until one o'clock, on the morning of the twenty-sixth, that the removal of the coffin-lid exposed, in the State Capitol, the white face that so many were anxious to see. From that time until two o'clock in the afternoon, there was a constant throng, the line reaching four deep from the State House to the foot of State street. It was estimated that there were sixty thousand people in the streets of Albany.

Here was another great procession; and, at four o'clock in the afternoon, the train started for Buffalo. Throughout the entire range of large and beautiful towns which the Central Railroad threads in its passage from Albany to Buffalo, the same demonstrations of grief and respect were witnessed which had thus far distinguished the homeward journey of the dead President. The reporter of the New York Tribune wrote that "a funeral in each house in Central New York would hardly have added solemnity to the day. At seven o'clock on the morning of the twenty-seventh, the funeral train reached Buffalo; and the sacred remains were taken to St.

James' Hall, where, from half-past nine until eight o'clock in the evening of the next day, they were visited by an immense throng of persons. Buffalo had already paid its tribute to Mr. Lincoln's memory by a large procession on the day of the funeral ceremonies at Washington, and omitted the usual pageant on this occasion; but a fine military escort, accompanied by a crowd of citizens, conducted the remains to the depot in the evening, which was left by the funeral train at ten o'clock, for the pursuit of the journey to Cleveland. The demonstrations of the popular grief which had been witnessed throughout the journey, were repeated at every station along the route.

Not only men, but women and children were up and wakeful all night, to catch a glimpse of the car which bore the precious dust of the beloved ruler; and, whenever the train stopped, flowers were brought in and deposited upon the coffin. At Cleveland, great preparations were made to receive the President's remains and the funeral party, with befitting honors.

A building for the deposit of the coffin was erected in the park, that the people might have easy access to it. The city was crowded at an early hour, on Friday morning; and on every hand were displayed the symbols of mourning. At seven o'clock, the train arrived at the Union depot, amid a salute of artillery; and from this point it was taken back to the Euclid Street station of the Cleveland and Pittsburg Railroad, whence the procession moved--the most imposing pageant that this beautiful city on the lake had ever created or witnessed.

Bishop McIlvaine, of the diocese of Ohio, read the Episcopal burial service on the opening of the coffin, and offered prayer; after which the long procession filed through the pavilion, and caught a last glimpse of the honored dead. All day long, through falling rain, the crowd, unabated in numbers, pressed through the little building. At ten o'clock at night, one hundred thousand people had viewed the remains; and then the gates were shut.

Soon afterwards, the coffin was taken from its beautiful resting-place; and, at twelve o'clock, the funeral party was again in progress, on the way to Columbus, the capital of the state. But why repeat the same story again, and again? Why say more than that at Columbus and Indianapolis and Chicago, as well as at all the intermediate places, men did what they could, and all that they could, to honor him who had died in their service--who had been murdered for his truth to them and to freedom?

It was a most remarkable exhibition of the popular feeling, and is unparalleled in history. There was nothing empty, nothing fictitious about it. There was never a sincerer tribute of affection rendered to a man than this. It was a costly one, but men rendered it gladly, and hesitated no more at the cost than if they were expressing their grief over the lost members of their own homes. It seemed almost like profanation of the sleeping President's rest, to bear him so far, and expose him so much; but the people demanded it, and would take no denial.

All parties, all sects--friends and foes alike--mingled in their affectionate tributes of honor and sorrow. When the remains of the President reached Chicago, they were at home. They were in the State in which he had spent the most of his life; and the people grasped him with almost a selfish sense of ownership. He was theirs. Only a short distance from the spot, lay his old antagonist, Douglas, in his last sleep.

The party champions were once more near each other, upon their favorite soil; but their eloquent lips were silent--silent with an eloquence surpassing sound, in the proclamation of mighty changes in the nation, and the suggestions of mutability and mortality among men. One more journey, and the weary form would rest. The people of Chicago honored the dead President with emotions that few thus far had experienced.

Lincoln had been loved and admired by the people of Illinois, long before the rest of the nation knew anything about him. His face and voice had been familiar to them for many years; and they had introduced him to the country and to immortality. He had walked through the portals of the new city into a fame as wide as the world.

He left us, asking that the prayers of the people might be offered to Almighty God for wisdom and help to see the right path and pursue it. Those prayers were answered. He accomplished his work, and now the prayers of the people ascend for help, to bear the great affliction which has fallen upon them. Slain as no other man has been slain, cut down while interposing his great charity and mercy between the wrath of the people and guilty traitors, the people of Chicago tenderly receive the sacred ashes, with bowed heads and streaming eyes.

The remains reached Springfield on the morning of May third.

Throughout the long ride of two hundred miles, over the continuous prairie that lies between Chicago and Springfield, there had transpired the most affecting demonstrations of the popular grief. Mottoes, flags, minute-guns, immense gatherings of the people, music, flowers, and copious tears, testified the universal sorrow. But in Springfield lived the heartiest mourners. Here were his intimate and life-long personal friends; and they received the dust of their murdered neighbor and fellow-citizen with a tenderness of which the people of no other community were capable.

The President was forgotten in the companion and friend, endeared to them by a thousand ties. The State House, the Lincoln residence, and every store, public building, and dwelling, were draped heavily with mourning--a manifestation of the public sorrow which remained for weeks and months after it had disappeared from all other places that had been passed in the long procession. For twenty-four hours, or until ten o'clock on the morning of May fourth, the people pressed into the State House, to gain a last glimpse of their departed friend.

Through all the long night of the third, the steady tramp of thousands was heard, winding up the stair-case that led to the Representatives' Chamber, and passing out again. Silently, patiently, sorrowfully, the unfailing procession moved; and it did not stop until the coffin-lid was shut down, no more to be opened. The procession which conducted the remains to their final resting-place, in a tomb prepared for them at Oak Ridge Cemetery, a beautiful spot about two miles from the city, was under the immediate charge of Major-general Joseph Hooker.

The town was thronged; and every train that arrived augmented the crowd. A large choir of two hundred and fifty singers sang the familiar hymn, beginning with the words,. The cemetery was occupied by a vast multitude, before the procession arrived; and from hill and tree they looked tearfully on, while the coffin which contained the dust of their friend was consigned to its sepulcher.

By the side of it was placed the coffin of "little Willie;" while the living sons, Robert and Thomas, standing by the tomb, were objects of an affectionate interest only equaled by the deep sorrow for their own and their country's loss. Hale of Springfield opened the religious exercises with prayer; a hymn written for the occasion was sung; selections from Scripture, and Mr.

Lincoln's last Inaugural were read; and Bishop Simpson, a favorite of Mr. Lincoln while living, delivered an eloquent address. Requiems and dirges, sung and played, completed the exercises of the occasion, closing with a benediction by Rev. Gurley of Washington. The address of Bishop Simpson, able, affectionate, and excellent as it was, contained nothing more notable than the quotation that the speaker made from one of Mr.

Lincoln's speeches, uttered in , in which, speaking of the slave power, he said: "Broken by it I, too, may be, bow to it, I never will. The probability that we may fail in the struggle, ought not to deter us from the support of a cause which I deem to be just; and it shall not deter me. If ever I feel the soul within me elevate and expand to those dimensions not wholly unworthy of its Almighty Architect, it is when I contemplate the cause of my country, deserted by all the world besides, and I, standing up boldly and alone, and hurling defiance at her victorious oppressors.

Here, without contemplating consequences, before high Heaven and in the face of the world, I swear eternal fidelity to the just cause, as I deem it, of the land of my life, my liberty and my love. Lincoln's utterances. It almost seems as if an intimation of his life and death were given to him at the moment--as if a glimpse into his own and his country's future had been vouchsafed to his excited vision.

The crowd slowly separated; the citizens moved back to their homes; those who had accompanied the precious remains--at last resting, and in safe and affectionate keeping--from Washington and points along the route, took their departure by the out-going trains; the guard paced their little round before the tomb, where through the grate the large and the little coffin lay in the dim light; and the people of Springfield were left to their grief and their glory.

There, surrounded by the sweetest scenes of nature, his tomb a shrine, his name the watchword of liberty, his fame in the affectionate keeping of mankind, his memory hallowed by martyrdom for the humane and Christian principles to which his life was devoted, the weary patriot rests. His sun went down suddenly, and whelmed the country in a darkness which was felt by every heart; but far up the clouds sprang soon the golden twilight, flooding the heavens with radiance, and illuminating every uncovered brow with the hope of a fair to-morrow.

The aching head, the shattered nerves, the anxious heart, the weary frame, are all at rest; and the noble spirit that informed them, bows reverently and humbly in the presence of Him in whom it trusted, and to whose work it devoted the troubled years of its earthly life. The death of Mr.


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Lincoln wrought great change in the feelings of all the representatives of foreign opinion, not only toward him, but toward the country and its cause; and many were the testimonials that came in every ship, of foreign sympathy with the nation in its bereavement and with those whose family life had been so cruelly dissolved by the deed of the assassin. The British Queen wrote to Mrs. Lincoln a letter of condolence, with her own hand. All the foreign governments took occasion to express their horror at the crime which had deprived the nation of its head, and their sympathy with the people thus suddenly and violently bereft.

The London Times, which had always been unjust to Mr. Lincoln, said: "It would be unjust not to acknowledge that Mr. Lincoln was a man who could not, under any circumstances, have been easily replaced. Lincoln as "the noblest President whom America has had since the time of Washington;" and "certainly the best, if not the ablest, man ruling over any country in the civilized world. Lincoln constantly rose in general estimation, by calmness of temper, by an intuitively logical appreciation of the character of the conflict, and by undisputed sincerity.

Lincoln is a very great and very lamentable event--perhaps the greatest and most lamentable which has occurred since the Coup d'etat , if not since Waterloo. It affects directly and immensely the welfare of the three most powerful countries in the world,--America, France and England,--and it affects them all for evil.

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Lincoln professed to wait on events, or, rather, on the manifestations of the moral forces around him, wherein, with a mind sobered by responsibility and unclouded by selfishness, he earnestly endeavored to read the will of God, which, having read it, he patiently followed to the best of his power. In him, his nation has lost, not a king, or a prophet,--not a creative moulder of its destinies, or an inspired unfolder of its future,--but simply a sensible interpreter, and a wise, temperate, honest executor of its own better mind.

Even these expressions of the British press do not indicate the popular feeling with which the English people received the announcement of Mr. Lincoln's assassination. The excitement which filled the public mind, on the reception of the startling tidings, in all the great cities and considerable towns of England, was only equaled by that which swept over those of our own country.

It was hard to tell whether horror at the crime or grief for its victim was the predominant emotion of the British people. Men who applauded the deed, were kicked out of assemblies in London, as they were in New York. The dignified Mr. Mason, the rebel commissioner, was boldly condemned for an attempt to extenuate the crime on the ground that it was a natural incident of civil war. At home, the change of feeling was hardly less marked and gratifying.

Presses that had done Mr. Lincoln injustice throughout his whole career, made haste to lay their tribute of respectful praise upon his bier. Men who had cursed him, joined tearfully in the processions which attended his long journey homeward. Even from the depths of the dead rebellion, there came honest lamentations, and sincere praises. The eyes of his "blinded fellow countrymen," which he so ardently desired to open, were unsealed at last, to behold, in the man they had so long regarded with hatred or contempt, the friend they had always possessed, and the benefactor they sorely needed, but had lost forever.

Andrew Johnson, the Vice-president, became, under the provisions of the Constitution, the President of the United States, by taking the oath of office, on the morning of the murder. The people who had battled for the Constitution and the laws so long, did not dream of a resort to any other course. The speculations of a portion of the foreign press, concerning this event, showed how unworthy and inadequate still was the estimate of the American people and their institutions. There was not a hand lifted, or a word uttered, to question or dispute the step which installed a new President over the republic; and there was not, in a single American heart, a doubt as to the result.

There was no panic, no excitement, no danger, no disaster; but the country kept to its groove, and felt no jar as it slid into the new administration. The world could not conceal Mr. Lincoln's murderer. It had no waste so wide, no cavern so deep, as to give him a safe hiding-place. That was evident to everybody; and would have been foreseen by himself, had he not been stultified by his greed for blood. Large rewards were offered for his apprehension, and military and police were quickly on the alert.

After a few days of doubt, it became evident that Booth, with a companion, had passed over the Navy Yard Bridge, which crosses the eastern branch of the Potomac. It was known that the assassin had been in the habit of spending much time in Charles County, Maryland, and had been in correspondence with the disloyal people there. It afterwards appeared that Booth, accompanied by David C. Harold, rode all night after the commission of the murder; and that near Bogantown he called on one Dr.

Mudd, to have his leg dressed, which had been fractured by his leap upon the stage, at the time he committed the murder. The detectives, reaching this region, and hearing that Dr. Mudd had received the visit of two suspicious strangers, arrested him and all his family. From this point, Booth and his accomplice were tracked toward the Potomac.

The ruffians were undoubtedly aided in their progress by disloyal citizens, for the officers were frequently not more than an hour behind them. Although gunboats were patrolling the river, the murderer and his accomplice crossed the Potomac under cover of darkness. It was soon afterwards ascertained where they had crossed, and the cavalry started in pursuit.

The men were found at last in a barn belonging to William Garratt. The building was surrounded, and Booth was called upon to surrender himself. He flatly refused to do so. Harold was ready to surrender, but Booth cursed him for a coward; and declared to Colonel Baker, at the head of the force, that he would not be taken alive. The barn was fired, and Booth attempted to extinguish the flame, but failed. Harold then gave himself up, while the murderer remained, displaying all the qualities of the hardened desperado. Sergeant Boston Corbett, moved by a sudden impulse, drew up his pistol, and fired upon Booth, who was seen standing in the barn, with a revolver in each hand; and planted a ball in his neck, which passed entirely through his head.

He died within less than three hours, sending to his mother a message to the effect that he had died for his country, and exhibiting no penitence whatever for the terrible deed he had committed. He was shot on the twenty-sixth of April, twelve days after the murder. His body was taken back to Washington, and was buried, no one save those to whom the task of sepulture was assigned having any knowledge of its place of burial.

Harold was committed to prison to await his trial. John Wilkes Booth was the son of the famous actor, Junius Brutus Booth, and had attained some celebrity in his father's profession. He was an exceedingly handsome man; but he had been notoriously and grossly profligate and immoral in his habits. Still, his gifts and his beauty had made him a favorite in certain nominally respectable social circles.

His sympathy with the rebellion was well understood in Washington, but he was never regarded as a dangerous man. That he committed the crime which cost him his life from any romantic love of the South, or from any desire to avenge the South for fancied wrongs, is not probable. The deed seems to have been the offspring of a morbid desire for immortality.

He had given frequent hints, in his conversation, of the miserable passion which possessed him; and there is no doubt that he had worked himself into a belief that he should rid the world of a tyrant by murdering the President, and thus link his name with a startling deed which, in the future, would be admired as a glorious act of heroism. Certainly his deed was one of wonderful boldness; and the bravery which he exhibited at his capture was worthy of a better cause and a better man.

Fortunately, no fatal wounds were inflicted upon Mr. Seward in Payne's attempt upon his life, or upon any of those who were subjects of violence at that ruffian's hands. The Secretary and his son, Mr. Frederick Seward, were desperately wounded; but, under skillful surgical care, they entirely recovered. Payne was arrested, and, with his fellow conspirators--David E. Harold who was captured with Booth, George A. Surratt and Dr. Samuel Mudd--was tried by a military commission.

The conspiracy contemplated not only the murder of Mr. Lincoln and Mr.


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Seward, but that of Vice-president Johnson and Lieutenant-general Grant. Booth alone accomplished his task. Payne made a desperate effort,--such as only a man of his great physical strength could make; but failed. Atzerodt, to whose hands the murder of the Vice-president was committed, was not competent, morally or physically, to the task he undertook; while General Grant escaped the projected attempt upon his life by leaving the city.

Harold, Atzerodt, Payne and Mrs. Surratt, the latter of whom aided and abetted the plot, were sentenced to be hanged; and they suffered the penalty of their crimes on the seventh day of July. Edward Spangler accompanied them, sentenced to hard labor for six years. The writer cannot bid farewell to the reader, and to the illustrious subject of this biography, without a closing tribute to a character unique in history, and an administration that stands alone in the annals of the nation.

We have seen one of the humblest of American citizens struggling through personal trials and national turmoils, into the light of universal fame, and an assured immortality of renown. We have seen him become the object of warm and devoted affection to a whole nation. We have witnessed such manifestations of grief at his loss as the death of no ruler has called forth, within the memory of man. We have seen a great popular government, poisoned in every department by the virus of treason, and blindly and feebly tottering to its death, restored to health and soundness through the beneficent ministry of this true man, who left it with vigor in its veins, irresistible strength in its arms, the fire of exultation and hope in its eyes, and with such power and majesty in its step, that the earth shook beneath its stately goings.

We have seen four millions of African bondmen who, groaning in helpless slavery when he received the crown of power, became freemen by his word before death struck that crown from his brow. We have seen the enemies of his country vanquished and suing for pardon; and the sneering nations of the world, whose incontinent contempt and spite were poured in upon him during the first years of his administration, becoming first silent, then respectful, and then unstinted in their admiration and approbation.

These marvelous changes in public feeling, and the revolutions imbodied in these wonderful results, were not the work of a mighty genius, sitting above the nation, and ordering its affairs. That Mr. Lincoln was much more than an ordinary man, in intellectual power, is sufficiently evident; but it was not by intellectual power that he wrought out the grand results of his life.

Lincoln, member of the Grand Lodge of fact possible that this error arose from the Lodge participated in the funeral ceremonies in. Grand Lodge and other Masonic bodies in the several States through which Lincoln's body was carried on its way from Washington to Springfield took part in the ceremonies. City of Washington, April 31, Master, G. These actions of the Masonic Grand Lodges of the United upon the death of Lincoln have not until this time been brought together. Comparison has been heretofore made between Abraham Lincoln and one of our first most excellent Grand Masters, in his virtuous and amiable conduct, in his unfeigned piety to God and in his inflexible fidelity to his trust, the Hiram who was also slain, and like him, his memory is not dimmed by the passing States.

Bostwick, G. While our hearts were swelling with gratitude to God that the dark clouds seemed lifting with signs of a coming peace, we are again plunged into the depths of sorrow at the loss of our beloved chief magistrate, upon whom all seemed to lean with confidence in this great emergency, struck down by the hands of a cowardly assassin. Whiting, G. His crime no mortal thought can measure, and none but Him who hath responsibilities. As members of a loyal and order-loving association, peculiarly bound to be peaceable subjects to the civil powers, and never to be concerned in plots or conspiracies against the peace and welfare of the nation, nor to behave undutifully to magistrates, are called to share in the deep and universal sorrow, it is meet that we should recognize the amiable and virtuous conduct, and.

That portion of the address of the G. And whereas, although he was not a member of our order, by his pure, and honest, and upright life, every act of which was marked by charity, brotherly love, relief and truth, he illustrated all the attributes that should beautify the life of a Free and Acin. Therefore does the Grand Lodge of the District of Columbia deem it eminently proper to announce to their Brethren and the world, their public appreciation of the dread calamity which has befallen the nation in the tragical death of its Chief Magistrate, their.

Resolved, That this Grand Lodge can find no words of sufficient strength to express their horror and detestation of the act which deprived our country of its good, and pure, and virtuous. Chief Magistrate, nor of the wicked assassin by whose hand the awful deed was done, and who has gone to meet the penaUy of his crime.

Resolved, That the bereaved widow and children of our murdered friend, have our sincere and heartfelt sympathies, and our fervent prayer that the. Resolved, That the officers and members of this Grand Lodge wear the usual badge of mourning for six months, in testi-. Resolved, That the Grand Secretary be directed to cause these proceedings to be published in the National Freemason and the newspapers of this city, to have a copy of them properly en-.

Whereas, In the inscrutable Providence of Almighty God, Lincoln, the first citizen of the United States by official station, the first by the rectitude of his life and daily conduct, the first by his devotion to the honor, interest and integrity of the country, the first by the power and influence which he wielded. And, whereas, It is due that this Grand Lodge, representing subordinate Lodges scattered over the whole expanse of the State of Indiana, should give expression to their sentiments at the appalling blow, which, like a thunderbolt from a cloudless sky, struck the heart of the whole nation therefore, Resolved, '[st.

That we look with abhorrence upon the act, ;. That we concur with freedom loving people all the expressions of regret and deep sorrow, event has called forth, and that we will cherish Abra-.

Resolved, 3d. That a copy of these resolutions be forwarded to the bereaved widow and family of the deceased in token of our heartfelt sympathy with the great loss, which they and the country at large have sustained. Above unanimously concurred in and adopted. Bromwell, G.

At fell at. Most High ruleth in the kingdoms of men and giveth it whomsoever he will. He was not a Free Mason, life and character he illustrated many of the virtues cherished by the Craft. Guilbert, M. Made glorious summer by our boys in blue; And all the clouds that low'r'd upon the land. In the deep bosom of the ocean buried. Now are our brows bound with victorious wreaths, Our bruised arms hung up for monuments ;.

Truly, the cloud has turned a "silver lining" to the light, but diamond in a setting of jet, that "silver lin-. Even in the hour of victory, while the glad lo rang over the jubilant North! Yet how swift was the puntruest friend the insurgents had. And how few there are that mourn because amid retributive physical pangs of the most excjuisitely painful character, this modern Judas gave up his worthless life and went to his reward.

Let every true Mason praise the G. God, Plimself had given her a misstate. The helmsman was gone, but as ever "strong and great," the glorious ship sailed on! For he won not power with the sword, But by the love a nation bore For him whose very soul was stirr'd With love for those he ruled o'er. Masons' hands assisted to bear him to the "equal grave" Masons' Lodges were clad in the emblems of mourning for departed worth, and Masons mingled their laments with those of the nation, which ;.

Parvin, G. Resolved, That as Masons we are taught to detest abin manner to and an rebellions and especial spiracies, plots ;. Resolved, That we humbly approach the grave of our murdered President, and with sorrow for his sad fate, will rear a. Preble, G. Though our horizon is again overshadowed with clouds, just as we all began to hope that the glorious sun of peace was about to rise upon and bless us, we will not give way to useless repinings, but with a firm faith and reliance that our Supreme Grand Mas-.

Bethesda Lodge forwarded resolution of sympathy to Grand Lodge ''the expression of their most sincere condolence and regret on the loss of so great and good a man as Abraham Lincoln. On this day were held the funeral obsequies of our late Chief Magistrate. The hands of an assassin robbed. In this take part in the solemn ceremonies of the day. Sir, you agreed with me, and being thus empowered. I invited the whole of the local craft to take a position in the procession.

Over five thousand brethren responded, and by my direction were dressed in black, with crepe on the left arm, and. It is the heart throb of an undivided people, who, forgetting every past difference, and every division which has for a brief time separated them, mournfully entwine the laurel with the cypress. In the very midst of them, in the very last exposition of and purposes, he paused to give utterance to the. Her brave, her beautiful her good, As when a loved one dies.

Cleveland, I issued a Dispensation authorizing them to appear. Master's address as related to the death of the late President of the United States, beg leave to report that there has been, and can be, but one feeling among the craft in Ohio in relation to. Your committee sincerely and heartreciprocate the sentiments expressed by the Grand Master in relation to the lamentable event, and approve the language in.

Your committee submit for your approval the following: Resolved, That the Freemasons of Ohio yield to no class of citizens in their devotion to the Government and Union established by our patriotic fathers, and have attested their loyalty thereto in every possible manner, the record of which is found not only at home, but on many a crimsoned field. Resolved, That while we sympathize with the country at large in the bereavement which it sustained in the death of the President, we regard with unmixed abhorrence and detestation the fiendish act which deprived the nation of its constitutional head at a perilous juncture in its history.

Washburn, G. But while we may rejoice that victory has perched upon our banners and right has come out triumphant in the contest, we. Jade's Collection. Washington, D. With L. It once was facetiously attempted to prove that Lincoln was a Mormon because in one of his early speeches he made a number of references to throat cutting, the penalty of the and because first Mormon another address shortly before his first inauguration he stated that sooner than surrender a certain principle he would have his body burned to ashes and those ashes oath, in scattered to the winds of heaven, the peculiar language in the Mormon oath.

It was not an unusual practice in the early days of Masonry sparsely settled localities, remote from an active Lodge, for several members of the fraternity to get together, form an emergent or occasional Lodge and make Masons, in this country in made of the proceedings. When Bowling Green died and was buried with Mait is somewhat significant that Lincoln was selected by the fraternity to make the address at the funeral, an address he was unable to finish, breaking down with emotion during the in sonic honors delivery.

If Lincoln was not a Mason irregularly made, he must have sympathy with the known objects of the Order to have been invited to speak at a Masonic funeral. Newman, that F. C, Ambrose E. Rankin, E. Prior to there was a Lodge at Springfield, Gray, Philo Deers, B. As Harmony Lodge is an offspring Lodge we have an indirect connection with the first in Lodge Springfield, Illinois, whose members were fellow towns- tional of National men of Lincoln if nothing more. Stephen Douglas does not appear Springfield in list of members of Lodge after On another anniversary of the birth of that distinguished man and Mason, George Washington, Lincoln delivered a speech on Inventions, in the course of which he alluded to the first invention, the fig leaf apron, showing his acquaintance with that venerable Masonic claim that Adam was the first Mason as he wore the first apron.

Lincoln also had some knowledge of operative masonry, the hammer, square and compass were familiar' to his hands, and in his early occupation as surveyor he laid out squares and calcu- lated horizontals and perpendiculars. References are to Federal Edition of Lincoln's Works. In a speech about the Bank, made in , hewn from occur the words, "Oath of secrecy," "divulged a secret," "does not every merchant have his secret mark?

Another sentence "Such belong not to the family of the lion : or the tribe of the eagle. In the Lost Township letter with the composition of which he "I defy probably had something to do, occurs the following: As this letter Here are some more of his Masonic words Daniel Webster, : Several times he used the words "Darkness to light," and in his telegram to General Sherman on his march to the sea, he said in the joint : "It brings those Note the emphasis by Mark the conclurepetition placed upon tlie word "dedicate.

No No No and! The true Masonic spirit breathes throughout the life of this remarkable man. Lodge of La Franche Union, partment of Seine. New slav- celebrate a Charente. To Grand Lodge of N. John, Gaillac Orient. Lin- children.

Abraham Lincoln - Wikiquote

Chapter of Mars and the Arts, Paris. Perseverance Lodge, Paris. Augustus the York: Beneficent, to Grand Lodge of New "First, the son of a laboring man, he was an apprentice, then he became a journeyman, and last, a master, thus realizing our Masonic symbols. Lodge of Gymnosophists, London. Social Progress Lodge, Florence. Holmes, Office of the G. French of Washington, which My M. Dear Sir and Yours of the 19th is R. Brother: just received. President Lincoln was not presence of M. He once told Simons, that he had me in the at and that he had not carried out I told him that it was not too his intentions.

Had he been my own could not have lamented his death more sincerely than knew, and ought to do. Very truly and Fraternally yours, B. An examination of the transactions of all the of the United States in existence in , shows French. Grand Lodges some reference 13 by the Grand Master to the death of Lincoln or some action by the Grand Lodge of the following jurisdictions : Connecticut. District of Columbia.

Abraham Lincoln and The Radicals

New New Iowa. As would be expected no was taken by any Southern afiford pathetic Hampshire. Comparison has been heretofore made between Abraham Lincoln and one of our first most excellent Grand Masters, in his virtuous and amiable conduct, in his unfeigned piety to God and in his inflexible fidelity to his trust, the Hiram who was also slain, and like him, his memory is not dimmed by the passing States years. From address of David E. His crime no mortal thought can measure, and none but Him who hath responsibilities down by the is mine, I will repay," can adequately punish.

McCurdy, and P. Hooe, : death by the hand of an assassin, by which a cloud of grief was spread over the people, in the deepest affection of whose hearts his many virtues had enshrined him. And whereas, although he was not a member of our order, by his pure, and honest, and upright life, every act of which was marked by charity, brotherly love, relief and truth, he illustrated all the attributes that should beautify the life of a Free and Acin ; cepted Mason ; Therefore does the Grand Lodge of the District of Columbia deem it eminently proper to announce to their Brethren and the world, their public appreciation of the dread calamity which has befallen the nation in the tragical death of its Chief Magistrate, their sorrow for its occurrence, and their abhorrence and detesand the criminal who so wickedly tation for the crime which, removed him from the scenes of earth.

Resolved, That while the blow of the assassin which struck down Abraham Lincoln, almost paralyzed the hearts of his fel- which he seemed dearer than any man who has lived since Washington, it has in no wise disconcerted the action of the Federal Government, the existence of which depends not low-citizens, to upon the life of any man, but ever lives in the patriotism of the American people. Resolved, That this Grand Lodge can find no words of sufficient strength to express their horror and detestation of the act which deprived our country of its good, and pure, and virtuous 16 Chief Magistrate, nor of the wicked assassin by whose hand the awful deed was done, and who has gone to meet the penaUy of his crime.

Resolved, That the bereaved widow and children of our murdered friend, have our sincere and heartfelt sympathies, and our fervent prayer that the God of the widow and the fatherless will mercy as to enable them and to say in submission and humility, "The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away so temper this dreadful affliction with to sustain their burden with fortitude, ; blessed be the name of the Lord. Resolved, That the Grand Secretary be directed to cause these proceedings to be published in the National Freemason and the newspapers of this city, to have a copy of them properly en- grossed and signed by the proper Grand Lodge, presented to Which was received and the the officers, and, under the seal of the family of the deceased.

Tribute to At meeting of bert Lange asked the Abraham Lincoln. Grand Lodge May 34, , Brother Al- that the rules be suspended to permit offer the following which was granted him to : Whereas, In the inscrutable Providence of Almighty God, Lincoln, the first citizen of the United States by official station, the first by the rectitude of his life and daily conduct, the first by his devotion to the honor, interest and integrity of the country, the first by the power and influence which he wielded Abraham 17 with wisdom, sagacity and courage, has been stricken the hand of an assassin; down by And, whereas, It is due that this Grand Lodge, representing subordinate Lodges scattered over the whole expanse of the State of Indiana, should give expression to their sentiments at the appalling blow, which, like a thunderbolt from a cloudless sky, struck the heart of the whole nation therefore, Resolved, '[st.

That we look with abhorrence upon the act, ; which took from us and the country, which he so faithfully served, the man who through four years of deadly strife, with an eye single to the maintenance of the Government, has guided and directed us, and who, with the haven of peace and security in sight, was by a dastardly act snatched from the full fruition of his labors.

That we concur with freedom loving people all the expressions of regret and deep sorrow, event has called forth, and that we will cherish Abra- Resolved, 2d. From On address of H. Pie eyes were turned to "the good President" as to the only being who could restore the Union, heal the wounds of war, and set the Government in motion in harmony with the new order of things.

At fell at that a time least be spared moment God permitted him when to be taken all away, to teach us Most High ruleth in the kingdoms of men and giveth it whomsoever he will. From address of Edward A. Now are our brows bound with victorious wreaths, Our bruised arms hung up for monuments ; Our Our stern alarms changed to merry meetings dreadful marches to delightful measures.

God, Plimself had given her a misstate sion to perform.