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12 disciples list:

When they opened the box, they found a set of dentures which had belonged to the Thirteenth Dalai Lama.


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I pointed to the box, and said that my teeth were in there, but right now I don't recall this at all. The new memories associated with this body are stronger. The past has become smaller, vaguer. Unless I made a specific attempt to develop such a memory, I don't recall it. Question: Do you remember your birth or the womb state before?

Answer: At this moment, I don't remember. Also, I can't recall if at that time when I was a small child, I could remember it. However, there was one slight external sign perhaps. Children are usually born with their eyes closed. I was born with my eyes open. This may be some slight indication of a clear state of mind in the womb. Question: Between the ages of sixteen and eighteen, after you assumed temporal power, did you change?

Answer: Yes, I changed a little bit.

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I underwent a lot of happiness and pain. Within that and from growing, gaining more experience, from the problems that arose and the suffering, I changed. The ultimate result is the man you see now laughter. Question: How about when you just entered adolescence? Many people have a difficult time defining themselves as an adult. Did this happen to you? Answer: No. My life was very much in a routine.

Two times a day I studied. Each time I studied for an hour, and then spent the rest of the time playing laughter. Then at the age of 13, I began studying philosophy, definitions, debate. My study increased, and I also studied calligraphy. It was all in a routine though, and I got used to it. Sometimes, there were vacations. These were very comfortable and happy. Losang Samten, my immediate elder brother, was usually at school, but during these times he would come to visit.

Also, my mother would come occasionally and bring special bread from our province of Amdo. Very thick and delicious. She made herself. Question: Are there any of your predecessors in whom you have a special interest or with whom you have a particular affinity? Answer: The Thirteenth Dalai Lama. He brought a lot of improvement to the standards of study in the monastic colleges. He gave great encouragement to the real scholars. He made it impossible for people to go up in the religious hierarchy, becoming an abbot and so forth, without being totally qualified. He was very strict in this respect.

He also gave tens of thousands of monks' ordinations. There were his two main religious achievements. He didn't give many initiations, or many lectures. Now, with respect to the country, he had great thought and consideration for statecraft. The outlying districts in particular. How they should be governed and so forth. He cared very much how to run the government more efficiently. He had great concern about our borders and that type of thing. Question: During the course of your life, what have been your greatest personal lessons or internal challenges?

Which realizations and experiences have had the most effect on your growth as an individual? Answer: Regarding religious experience, some understanding of shunya emptiness: lack of independent self nature some feeling, some experience and mostly bodhichitta, altruism. It has helped a lot. In some ways, you could say that it has made me into a new person, a new man. I am still progressing.

It gives you inner strength, courage, and it is easier to accept situations. That's one of the greatest experiences. Question: When you became a refugee, what helped you gain this strength? Was it the loss of your position and country, the fact of everyone suffering around you. Were you called on to lead your people in a different way than you had been accustomed to?

Answer: Being a refugee is really a desperate, dangerous situation. At that time, everyone deals with reality. It is not the time to pretend things are beautiful. That's something. You feel involved with reality. In peace time, everything goes smoothly. Even if there is a problem, people pretend that things are good. During a dangerous period, when there's a dramatic change, then there's no scope to pretend that everything is fine. You must accept that bad is bad. Now when I left the Norbulinka, there was danger. We were passing very near the Chinese military barracks. It was just on the other side of the river, the Chinese check post there.

You see, we had definite information two or three weeks before I left, that the Chinese were fully prepared to attack us. It was only a question of the day and hour. Question: About you being the incarnation of the bodhisattva of infinite compassion, Avalokiteshvara. How do you personally feel about this? Is it something you have an unequivocal view of one way or another?

In late December, Dickens wrote to Mary Boyle that " Great Expectations [is] a very great success and universally liked. Dickens gave six readings from 14 March to 18 April , and in May, Dickens took a few days' holiday in Dover. On the eve of his departure, he took some friends and family members for a trip by boat from Blackwall to Southend-on-Sea.

Ostensibly for pleasure, the mini-cruise was actually a working session for Dickens to examine banks of the river in preparation for the chapter devoted to Magwitch's attempt to escape. Following comments by Edward Bulwer-Lytton that the ending was too sad, Dickens rewrote it prior to publication. The ending set aside by Dickens has Pip, who is still single, briefly see Estella in London; after becoming Bentley Drummle's widow, she has remarried.

His changes at the conclusion of the novel did not quite end either with the final weekly part or the first bound edition, because Dickens further changed the last sentence in the amended version from "I could see the shadow of no parting from her. Angus Calder , writing for an edition in the Penguin English Library , believed the less definite phrasing of the amended version perhaps hinted at a buried meaning: ' In a letter to Forster, Dickens explained his decision to alter the draft ending: "You will be surprised to hear that I have changed the end of Great Expectations from and after Pip's return to Joe's Bulwer, who has been, as I think you know, extraordinarily taken with the book, strongly urged it upon me, after reading the proofs, and supported his views with such good reasons that I have resolved to make the change.

I have put in as pretty a little piece of writing as I could, and I have no doubt the story will be more acceptable through the alteration. This discussion between Dickens, Bulwer-Lytton and Forster has provided the basis for much discussion on Dickens's underlying views for this famous novel. Earle Davis, in his study of Dickens, wrote that "it would be an inadequate moral point to deny Pip any reward after he had shown a growth of character," and that "Eleven years might change Estella too. In contrast, John Hillis-Miller stated that Dickens's personality was so assertive that Bulwer-Lytton had little influence, and welcomed the revision: "The mists of infatuation have cleared away, [Estella and Pip] can be joined.

George Orwell wrote, "Psychologically the latter part of Great Expectations is about the best thing Dickens ever did," but, like John Forster and several early 20th century writers, including George Bernard Shaw , felt that the original ending was more consistent with the draft, as well as the natural working out of the tale. Since Dickens was his own publisher, he did not require a contract for his own works. Dickens welcomed a contract with Tauchnitz 4 January for publication in English for the European continent. Publications in Harper's Weekly were accompanied by forty illustrations by John McLenan; [61] however, this is the only Dickens work published in All the Year Round without illustrations.

Robert L Patten identifies four American editions in and sees the proliferation of publications in Europe and across the Atlantic as "extraordinary testimony" to Great Expectations' s popularity. The "bargain" edition was published in , the Library Edition in , and the Charles Dickens edition in To this list, Paul Schlicke adds "two meticulous scholarly editions", one Clarendon Press published in with an introduction by Margaret Cardwell and another with an introduction by Edgar Rosenberg, published by Norton in In some 20th century editions, the novel ends as originally published in , and in an afterword, the ending Dickens did not publish, along with a brief story of how a friend persuaded him to a happier ending for Pip, is presented to the reader for example, audio edition by Recorded Books [63].

In , Marcus Stone, [64] son of Dickens's old friend, the painter Frank Stone, was invited to create eight woodcuts for the Library Edition. According to Paul Schlicke, these illustrations are mediocre yet were included in the Charles Dickens edition, and Stone created illustrations for Dickens's subsequent novel, Our Mutual Friend. Fraser, [67] and Harry Furniss.

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Robert L Patten estimates that All the Year Round sold , copies of Great Expectations each week, and Mudie, the largest circulating library, which purchased about 1, copies, stated that at least 30 people read each copy. Dickens wrote to Forster in October that "You will not have to complain of the want of humour as in the Tale of Two Cities ," [70] an opinion Forster supports, finding that "Dickens's humour, not less than his creative power, was at its best in this book. Overall, Great Expectations received near universal acclaim. Critics in the 19th and 20th centuries hailed it as one of Dickens's greatest successes although often for conflicting reasons: GK Chesterton admired the novel's optimism; Edmund Wilson its pessimism; Humphry House in emphasized its social context.

In , Jerome H. Buckley saw it as a bildungsroman, writing a chapter on Dickens and two of his major protagonists David Copperfield and Pip in his book on the Bildungsroman in Victorian writing. Great Expectations ' s single most obvious literary predecessor is Dickens's earlier first-person narrator-protagonist David Copperfield.

The two novels trace the psychological and moral development of a young boy to maturity, his transition from a rural environment to the London metropolis, the vicissitudes of his emotional development, and the exhibition of his hopes and youthful dreams and their metamorphosis, through a rich and complex first person narrative. The two books both detail homecoming. Although David Copperfield is based on some of Dickens personal experiences, Great Expectations provides, according to Paul Schlicke, "the more spiritual and intimate autobiography.

No place name is mentioned, [N 4] nor a specific time period, which is generally indicated by, among other elements, older coaches, the title "His Majesty" in reference to George III , and the old London Bridge prior to the — reconstruction. The theme of homecoming reflects events in Dickens's life, several years prior to the publication of Great Expectations. In , he bought Gad's Hill Place in Higham , Kent, which he had dreamed of living in as a child, and moved there from faraway London two years later.

In , in a painful divorce, he separated from Catherine Dickens, his wife of twenty-three years. The divorce alienated him from some of his closest friends, such as Mark Lemon. He quarrelled with Bradbury and Evans , who had published his novels for fifteen years. In early September , in a field behind Gad's Hill, Dickens burned almost all of his correspondence, sparing only letters on business matters. The Uncommercial Traveller , short stories, and other texts Dickens began publishing in his new weekly in reflect his nostalgia, as seen in "Dullborough Town" and "Nurses' Stories".

According to Paul Schlicke, "it is hardly surprising that the novel Dickens wrote at this time was a return to roots, set in the part of England in which he grew up, and in which he had recently resettled. Margaret Cardwell draws attention to Chops the Dwarf from Dickens's Christmas story "Going into Society", who, as the future Pip does, entertains the illusion of inheriting a fortune and becomes disappointed upon achieving his social ambitions. Stone also asserts that The Lazy Tour of Two Idle Apprentices , written in collaboration with Wilkie Collins after their walking tour of Cumberland during September and published in Household Words from 3 to 31 October of the same year, presents certain strange locations and a passionate love, foreshadowing Great Expectations.

Beyond its biographical and literary aspects, Great Expectations appears, according to Robin Gilmour, as "a representative fable of the age". That the hero Pip aspires to improve, not through snobbery, but through the Victorian conviction of education, social refinement, and materialism, was seen as a noble and worthy goal.

However, by tracing the origins of Pip's "great expectations" to crime, deceit and even banishment to the colonies, Dickens unfavourably compares the new generation to the previous one of Joe Gargery, which Dickens portrays as less sophisticated but especially rooted in sound values, presenting an oblique criticism of his time. The narrative structure of Great Expectations is influenced by the fact that it was first published as weekly episodes in a periodical. This required short chapters, centred on a single subject, and an almost mathematical structure.

Pip's story is told in three stages: his childhood and early youth in Kent, where he dreams of rising above his humble station; his time in London after receiving "great expectations"; and then finally his disillusionment on discovering the source of his fortune, followed by his slow realisation of the vanity of his false values. This symmetry contributes to the impression of completion, which has often been commented on.

George Gissing, for example, when comparing Joe Gargery and Dan'l Peggotty from David Copperfield , preferred the former, because he is a stronger character, who lives "in a world, not of melodrama , but of everyday cause and effect. Shaw also commented on the novel's structure, describing it as "compactly perfect", and Algernon Swinburne stated, "The defects in it are as nearly imperceptible as spots on the sun or shadow on a sunlit sea. Further, beyond the chronological sequences and the weaving of several storylines into a tight plot, the sentimental setting and morality of the characters also create a pattern.

There is a further organizing element that can be labelled "Dangerous Lovers", which includes Compeyson, Bentley Drummle and Orlick. Pip is the centre of this web of love, rejection and hatred. Dickens contrasts this "dangerous love" with the relationship of Biddy and Joe, which grows from friendship to marriage.

This is "the general frame of the novel". The term "love" is generic, applying it to both Pip's true love for Estella and the feelings Estella has for Drummle, which are based on a desire for social advancement. Similarly, Estella rejects Magwitch because of her contempt for everything that appears below what she believes to be her social status. Great Expectations has an unhappy ending, since most characters suffer physically, psychologically or both, or die—often violently—while suffering. Happy resolutions remain elusive, while hate thrives. The only happy ending is Biddy and Joe's marriage and the birth of their two children, since the final reconciliations, except that between Pip and Magwitch, do not alter the general order.

Though Pip extirpates the web of hatred, the first unpublished ending denies him happiness while Dickens' revised second ending, in the published novel, leaves his future uncertain. Julian Monayhan argues that the reader can better understand Pip's personality through analyzing his relationship with Orlick, the criminal laborer who works at Joe Gargery's forge, than by looking at his relationship with Magwitch. Co-workers in the forge, both find themselves at Miss Havisham's, where Pip enters and joins the company, while Orlick, attending the door, stays out.

Orlick also aspires to "great expectations" and resents Pip's ascension from the forge and the swamp to the glamour of Satis House, from which Orlick is excluded, along with London's dazzling society. Orlick is the cumbersome shadow Pip cannot remove. Then comes Pip's punishment, with Orlick's savage attack on Mrs Gargery. Thereafter Orlick vanishes, only to reappear in chapter 53 in a symbolic act, when he lures Pip into a locked, abandoned building in the marshes. Orlick has a score to settle before going on to the ultimate act, murder. However, Pip hampers Orlick, because of his privileged status, while Orlick remains a slave of his condition, solely responsible for Mrs Gargery's fate.

Dickens also uses Pip's upper class counterpart, Bentley Drummle, "the double of a double", according to Trotter, in a similar way. Estella rejects Pip for this rude, uncouth but well-born man, and ends Pip's hope. Finally the lives of both Orlick and Drummle end violently. Although the novel is written in first person, the reader knows—as an essential prerequisite—that Great Expectations is not an autobiography but a novel , a work of fiction with plot and characters, featuring a narrator-protagonist.

However, according to Paul Pickerel's analysis, Pip—as both narrator and protagonist—recounts with hindsight the story of the young boy he was, who did not know the world beyond a narrow geographic and familial environment. The novel's direction emerges from the confrontation between the two periods of time.

At first, the novel presents a mistreated orphan, repeating situations from Oliver Twist and David Copperfield , but the trope is quickly overtaken. The theme manifests itself when Pip discovers the existence of a world beyond the marsh, the forge and the future Joe envisioned for him, the decisive moment when Miss Havisham and Estella enter his life. At this point, the reader knows more than the protagonist, creating dramatic irony that confers a superiority that the narrator shares.

It is not until Magwitch's return, a plot twist that unites loosely connected plot elements and sets them into motion, that the protagonist's point of view joins those of the narrator and the reader. Amongst the narrative devices that Dickens uses, according to Earle Davis, are caricature , comic speech mannerisms, intrigue, Gothic atmosphere, and a central character who gradually changes. Davis also mentions the close network of the structure and balance of contrasts, and praises the first-person narration for providing a simplicity that is appropriate for the story while avoiding melodrama.

Davis sees the symbolism attached to "great expectations" as reinforcing the novel's impact. Great Expectations contains the elements of a variety of different literary genres , including the bildungsroman, gothic novel, crime novel, as well as comedy , melodrama and satire ; and it belongs—like Wuthering Heights and the novels of Walter Scott —to the romance rather than realist tradition of the novel.

Complex and multifaceted, Great Expectations is a Victorian bildungsroman , a German literary genre from the eighteenth century, also called an initiatory tale. This genre focuses on a protagonist who matures over the course of the novel. Great Expectations describes Pip's initial frustration upon leaving home, followed by a long and difficult period where he gradually matures. This period in his life is punctuated with conflicts between his desires and the values of established order, that allow him to re-evaluate his life and therefore re-enter society on new foundations.

However, if viewed as a primarily retrospective first-person narrative, the novel differs from the two preceding pseudo-autobiographies, David Copperfield and though only partially narrated in first-person, Bleak House , as it falls within several subgenres popular in Dickens' time, as noted by Paul Davis [] and Philip V. Great Expectations contains many comic scenes and eccentric personalities, which play an integral part in both the plot and the theme.

Among the notable comic episodes are Pip's Christmas dinner in chapter 4, Wopsle's Hamlet performance in chapter 31, and Wemmick's marriage in chapter Many of the characters have eccentricities: Jaggers with his punctilious lawyerly ways; the contrariness of his clerk, Wemmick, at work advising Pip to invest in "portable property", while in private living in a cottage converted into a castle; and the reclusive Miss Havisham in her decaying mansion, wearing her tattered bridal robes. Great Expectations incorporates elements of the new genre of crime fiction , which Dickens had already used in Oliver Twist , and which was being developed by his friends Wilkie Collins and William Harrison Ainsworth.

With its scenes of convicts, prison ships , and episodes of bloody violence, Dickens creates characters worthy of the Newgate school of fiction. Great Expectations contains elements of the Gothic genre , especially with Miss Havisham, the bride frozen in time, and the ruins of Satis House filled with weeds and spiders. Then there is the fight to the death between Compeyson and Magwitch, and the fire that ends up killing Miss Havisham, scenes that are dominated by horror, suspense, and the sensational, such as are found in gothic novels. Elements of the silver fork novel are found in the character of Miss Havisham and her world, as well as Pip's illusions.

This genre, which flourished in the s and s, [] presents the flashy elegance and aesthetic frivolities found in high society. Though Great Expectations is not obviously a historical novel Dickens does emphasise differences between the time that the novel is set c. Great Expectations begins around the date of Dickens' birth , continues until around —, and then jumps to around —, during which the Great Western Railway was built. Among these details—that contemporary readers would have recognised—are the one pound note in chapter 10 that the Bank Notes Act had removed from circulation; [] likewise, the death penalty for deported felons who returned to Britain was abolished in The gallows erected in the swamps, designed to display a rotting corpse, had disappeared by , and George III , the monarch mentioned at the beginning, died in , when Pip would have been seven or eight.

Miss Havisham paid Joe 25 guineas, gold coins, when Pip was to begin his apprenticeship in chapter 13 ; guinea coins were slowly going out of circulation after the last new ones were struck with the face of George III in This also marks the historical period, as the one pound note was the official currency at the time of the novel's publication. Dickens placed the epilogue 11 years after Magwitch's death, which seems to be the time limit of the reported facts.

Collectively, the details suggest that Dickens identified with the main character. If Pip is around 23 toward the middle of the novel and 34 at its end, he is roughly modeled after his creator who turned 34 in The title's "Expectations" refers to "a legacy to come", [] and thus immediately announces that money, or more specifically wealth plays an important part in the novel. The novel is also concerned with questions relating to conscience and moral regeneration, as well as redemption through love. Dickens famously created comic and telling names for his characters, [ citation needed ] but in Great Expectations he goes further.

The first sentence of the novel establishes that Pip's proper name is Philip Pirrip, which "my infant tongue could make of both names nothing longer or more explicit than Pip. In Chapter 18, when he receives his expectation from an anonymous benefactor, the first condition attached to it is "that you always bear the name of Pip. In Chapter 22, when Pip establishes his friendship with Herbert Pocket, he attempts to introduce himself as Philip.

Herbert immediately rejects the name "'I don't take to Philip,' said he, smiling, 'for it sounds like a moral boy out of the spelling-book'" and decides to refer to Pip exclusively as Handel "'Would you mind Handel for a familiar name? There's a charming piece of music by Handel, called the Harmonious Blacksmith. Pip's name throughout binds him to his origins.

A central theme here, as in other of Dickens's novels, is of people living as social outcasts. The novel opening emphasises this in the case of the orphaned Pip, who lives in an isolated foggy environment next to a graveyard, dangerous swamps, and prison ships. His very existence reproaches him: "I was always treated as if I had insisted on being born in opposition to the dictates of reason, religion and morality". Pip feels excluded by society and this leads to his aggressive attitude towards it, as he tries to win his place within society through any means. Various other characters behave similarly—that is, the oppressed become the oppressors.

Jaggers dominates Wemmick, who in turn dominates Jaggers's clients. However, hope exists despite Pip's sense of exclusion [] because he is convinced that divine providence owes him a place in society and that marriage to Estella is his destiny. Therefore, when fortune comes his way, Pip shows no surprise, because he believes, that his value as a human being, and his inherent nobility, have been recognized.

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Thus Pip accepts Pumblechook's flattery without blinking: "That boy is no common boy" [] and the "May I? May I? From Pip's hope comes his "uncontrollable, impossible love for Estella", [] despite the humiliations to which she has subjected him. For Pip, winning a place in society also means winning Estella's heart. When the money secretly provided by Magwitch enables Pip to enter London society, two new related themes, wealth and gentility, are introduced. As the novel's title implies money is a theme of Great Expectations.

Central to this is the idea that wealth is only acceptable to the ruling class if it comes from the labour of others. Her wealth is "pure", and her father's profession as a brewer does not contaminate it. Herbert states in chapter 22 that "while you cannot possibly be genteel and bake, you may be as genteel as never was and brew. She remains in a constant business relationship with her lawyer Jaggers and keeps a tight grip over her "court" of sycophants, so that, far from representing social exclusion, she is the very image of a powerful landed aristocracy that is frozen in the past and "embalmed in its own pride".

On the other hand, Magwitch's wealth is socially unacceptable, firstly because he earned it, not through the efforts of others, but through his own hard work, and secondly because he was a convict, and he earned it in a penal colony. It is argued that the contrast with Miss Havisham's wealth is suggested symbolically. Thus Magwitch's money smells of sweat, and his money is greasy and crumpled: "two fat sweltering one-pound notes that seemed to have been on terms of the warmest intimacy with all the cattle market in the country", [] while the coins Miss Havisham gives for Pip's "indentures" shine as if new.

Further, it is argued Pip demonstrates his "good breeding", because when he discovers that he owes his transformation into a "gentleman" to such a contaminated windfall, he is repulsed in horror. Cockshut, however, has suggested that there is no difference between Magwitch's wealth and that of Miss Havisham's. Trotter emphasizes the importance of Magwitch's greasy banknotes. Beyond the Pip's emotional reaction the notes reveal that Dickens' views on social and economic progress have changed in the years prior to the publication of Great Expectations.

To illustrate his point, he cites Humphry House who, succinctly, writes that in Pickwick Papers , "a bad smell was a bad smell", whereas in Our Mutual Friend and Great Expectations , "it is a problem". However, research from Stony Brook University in New York suggests that some couples keep romantic feelings alive for much longer. Attachment styles that people develop as children can influence the way that they interact with partners in adult relationships, with secure attachment styles being associated with healthier and more trusting relationships than avoidant or anxious attachment styles.

Singer a, [38] b, [39] [40] first defined love based on four Greek terms: eros , meaning the search for beauty; philia , the feelings of affection in close friendships, nomos , the submission of and obedience to higher or divine powers, and agape , the bestowal of love and affection for the divine powers. While Singer did believe that love was important to world culture, he did not believe that romantic love played a major role Singer, [40].

However, Susan Hendrick and Clyde Hendrick at Texas Tech University , [41] [42] have theorized that romantic love will play an increasingly important cultural role in the future, as it is considered an important part of living a fulfilling life. They also theorized that love in long-term romantic relationships has only been the product of cultural forces that came to fruition within the past years.

By cultural forces, they mean the increasing prevalence of individualistic ideologies, which are the result of an inward shift of many cultural worldviews. Researchers have determined that romantic love is a complex emotion that can be divided into either passionate or companionate forms. Passionate love is an arousal-driven emotion that often gives people extreme feelings of happiness, and can also give people feelings of anguish. Researchers have described the stage of passionate love as "being on cocaine", since during that stage the brain releases the same neurotransmitter, dopamine, as when cocaine is being used.

Robert Firestone, a psychologist, has a theory of the fantasy bond, which is what is mostly created after the passionate love has faded. A couple may start to feel really comfortable with each other to the point that they see each other as simply companions or protectors, but yet think that they are still in love with each other. Hendrick and Hendrick [49] studied college students who were in the early stages of a relationship and found that almost half reported that their significant other was their closest friend, providing evidence that both passionate and companionate love exist in new relationships.

Conversely, in a study of long-term marriages, researchers Contreras, Hendrick, and Hendrick, [50] found that couples endorsed measures of both companionate love and passionate love and that passionate love was the strongest predictor of marital satisfaction, showing that both types of love can endure throughout the years.

Psychologist Robert Sternberg [51] developed the triangular theory of love. He theorized that love is a combination of three main components: passion physical arousal ; intimacy psychological feelings of closeness ; and commitment the sustaining of a relationship.

He also theorized that the different combinations of these three components could yield up to seven different forms of love. These include popularized forms such as romantic love intimacy and passion and consummate love passion, intimacy, and commitment. The other forms are liking intimacy , companionate love intimacy and commitment , empty love commitment , fatuous love passion and commitment , and infatuation passion. On the other hand, Acker and Davis [53] found that commitment was the strongest predictor of relationship satisfaction, especially for long-term relationships.

Researchers Arthur and Elaine Aron [54] theorized that humans have a basic drive to expand their self-concepts. A study following college students for 10 weeks showed that those students who fell in love over the course of the investigation reported higher feelings of self-esteem and self efficacy than those who did not Aron, Paris, and Aron, [55]. Recent research suggests that romantic relationships impact daily behaviors and people are influenced by the eating habits of their romantic partners.

Specifically, in the early stages of romantic relationships, women are more likely to be influenced by the eating patterns i. Researchers such as Feeney and Noller question the stability of attachment style across the life span since studies that measured attachment styles at time points ranging from 2 weeks to 8 months found that 1 out of 4 adults' attachment style changed.

Another topic of controversy in the field of romantic relationships is that of domestic abuse. Following the theory that romantic love evolved as a byproduct of survival, it can be said that in some instances, it has turned into a maladaptation. Oxytocin is a neurophysical hormone produced in the brain. It is known to cause a decrease in stress response.

It also can cause an increase in feelings of attachment. In the beginning stages of a romantic relationship, OT levels surge and then remain relatively stable over the duration of the relationship. The higher the surge of OT, the greater the likelihood is of partners staying together. Individuals ranked high in rejection sensitivity exhibited aggressive tendencies and decreased willingness for cooperation, indicating a link between oxytocin and relationship maintenance.

The feelings associated with romantic love function to ensure the greater reproductive fitness of individuals. The obligations of individuals in romantic relationships to preserve these bonds are based in kin selection theory, where by exhibiting aggressive behavior, a mate can use intimidation and dominance to ward off other potential predators, thus protecting the pair bond and their actual or potential offspring.

This has however evolved to the point where it has become detrimental to the fitness of individuals; what is causing attachment to occur in a relationship, is now causing one partner to harm the other.

Romance (love)

In the search for the root of intimate partner violence IPV , intranasal oxytocin was administered to a control group and a group of participants with aggressive tendencies. Participants were then surveyed on how willing they were to engage in 5 behaviors towards their romantic partner. What they found was that oxytocin increased IPV inclinations only among the participants with a predisposition towards aggressive tendencies. This, coupled with its role in relationship maintenance, illustrates that oxytocin serves to instill a sense of territoriality and protectiveness towards a mate.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Type of love that focuses on feelings. This article is about a type of emotional attachment. For the modern popular-fiction genre, see Romance novel. For the historical era associated with the arts, see Romanticism. For other uses, see Romance disambiguation. This article has multiple issues.

Please help improve it or discuss these issues on the talk page. Learn how and when to remove these template messages. This article is written like a personal reflection, personal essay, or argumentative essay that states a Wikipedia editor's personal feelings or presents an original argument about a topic. Please help improve it by rewriting it in an encyclopedic style.


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July Learn how and when to remove this template message. This article possibly contains original research. Please improve it by verifying the claims made and adding inline citations. Statements consisting only of original research should be removed. January Learn how and when to remove this template message. Types of love.

Cultural views. Related subjects. Polygamy Polyandry Polygyny. Cicisbeo Concubinage Courtesan Mistress. Breakup Separation Annulment Divorce Widowhood. Emotions and feelings. This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. This article may require cleanup to meet Wikipedia's quality standards.

The specific problem is: Very awkward prose. No indication why the cited authors are significant. Please help improve this article if you can. September Learn how and when to remove this template message. Limerence , the state of mind which arises from romantic attraction Platonic love Chivalric romance Romantic orientation Interpersonal attraction Courtly love Erotomania Erotophobia Heterosociality Homosociality Infatuation Intimate relationship Love Love at first sight Lovesickness Marriage Romantic friendship Romantic comedy Romance novel Sexual relationship Valentine's Day Romantic practices flirting fraternizing gift-giving flowers candy jewellery promise ring engagement ring wedding ring courtship pet names baby talk intimacy eye contact hugging holding hands kissing love letter Dating Couple dancing Movies Serenade.

14 Anime Characters Who Are Intensely Pessimistic

Romance, parenthood, and gender in a modern African society. Ethnology , Retrieved 25 May Hoboken: Wiley. Romance, Intimacy, and The Marriage Crisis. Retrieved Journal of Marital and Family Therapy. He had brief relationships with only a few women, always of the nobility. His one actual engagement was broken off mainly because of his conflicts with noble society as a group.

This is evidenced in his biography, such as in Maynard Solomon's account. Toril Moi, Diacritics Vol.

Who were the 12 disciples?

In Marxism the romantic might be considered an example of alienation. Shakespeare Quarterly. Diamond Current Directions in Psychological Science.