Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Margot and Olivia (Matriarchal Succession Book 1) file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Margot and Olivia (Matriarchal Succession Book 1) book. Happy reading Margot and Olivia (Matriarchal Succession Book 1) Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Margot and Olivia (Matriarchal Succession Book 1) at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Margot and Olivia (Matriarchal Succession Book 1) Pocket Guide.
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Yet it begins and ends with the Majorcan pianino, which assumed an astonishing cultural potency during the Second World War as it became, for the Nazis, a symbol of the man and music they were determined to appropriate as their own. After Chopin, the unexpected hero of Chopin's Piano is the great keyboard player Wanda Landowska, who rescued the pianino from Valldemossa in , and who would later become one of the most influential artistic figures of the twentieth century. Paul Kildea shows how her story--a compelling account based for the first time on her private papers--resonates with Chopin's, simultaneously distilling part of the cultural and political history of mid-twentieth century Europe and the United States.

After Landowska's flight to America from Paris, which the Germans would occupy only days later, her possessions--including her rare music manuscripts and beloved keyboards--were seized by the Nazis. Only some of these belongings survived the war; those that did were recovered by the Allied armies' Monuments Men and restituted to Landowska's house in France. In scintillating prose, and with an eye for exquisite detail, Kildea beautifully interweaves these narratives, which comprise a journey through musical Romanticism--one that illuminates how art is transmitted, interpreted, and appropriated between generations.

Teaching Struggling Students by Laura M. Harrison Call Number: 3rd Floor This book tackles the phenomenon of limited learning on campuses by approaching it from the point of view of the author, an educator who writes about the experience of being, simultaneously, a college student and a college professor. The author lays out her experience as a student struggling in an introductory linguistics class, framing her struggles as sites ripe for autoethnographic interrogation. Throughout the book, the author melds her personal narratives with the extant research on college student learning, college readiness, and the interconnectedness of affect, intellect, and socio-cultural contexts.

This book poses a challenge to the current binary metanarrative that circles the college student learning conundrum, which highlights either the faculty or student perspective, and unfolds this unnecessary binary into a rich, nuanced, and polyvocal set of perspectives. Jewish writers have long had a sense of place in the United States, and interpretations of American geography have appeared in Jewish American literature from the colonial era forward.

But troublingly, scholarship on Jewish American literary history often limits itself to an immigrant model, situating the Jewish American literary canon firmly and inescapably among the immigrant authors and early environments of the early twentieth century. In A Hundred Acres of America, Michael Hoberman combines literary history and geography to restore Jewish American writers to their roles as critical members of the American literary landscape from the s to the present, and to argue that Jewish history, American literary history, and the inhabitation of American geography are, and always have been, contiguous entities.

Mays Call Number: Argues that Indigenous hip hop is the latest and newest assertion of Indigenous sovereignty throughout Indigenous North America. In The Race of Sound Nina Sun Eidsheim traces the ways in which sonic attributes that might seem natural, such as the voice and its qualities, are socially produced. Eidsheim illustrates how listeners measure race through sound and locate racial subjectivities in vocal timbre--the color or tone of a voice.

Eidsheim examines singers Marian Anderson, Billie Holiday, and Jimmy Scott as well as the vocal synthesis technology Vocaloid to show how listeners carry a series of assumptions about the nature of the voice and to whom it belongs. Outlining how the voice is linked to ideas of racial essentialism and authenticity, Eidsheim untangles the relationship between race, gender, vocal technique, and timbre while addressing an undertheorized space of racial and ethnic performance. In so doing, she advances our knowledge of the cultural-historical formation of the timbral politics of difference and the ways that comprehending voice remains central to understanding human experience, all the while advocating for a form of listening that would allow us to hear singers in a self-reflexive, denaturalized way.

Reiss Editor Call Number: 2nd Floor An indispensable tool for biology teacher educators, researchers, graduate students, and practising teachers, this book presents up-to-date research, addresses common misconceptions, and discusses the pedagogical content knowledge necessary for effective teaching of key topics in biology. Written by leading experts on their respective topics from a range of countries across the world, this international book transcends national curricula and highlights global issues, problems, and trends in biology literacy.

This is a deliberately provocative book crossing many disciplinary boundaries and locating music and art education within a context of contemporary social and political problems in a time of growing disruption and authoritarianism. Intended firstly for music teacher educators, practicing music teachers, and graduate and undergraduate music education majors, the book also speaks to arts and media studies teachers, parents, or others interested in exploring how composing, performing, improvising, conducting, listening, dancing, teaching, learning, or engaging in music or education criticism are all political acts because fundamentally concerned with social values and thus inseparable from power and politics.

Among the book's central themes are the danger of democratic deconsolidation in the West and how music education can help counter that threat through the fostering of democratic citizens who are aware of music's ubiquity in their lives and its many roles in shaping public opinion and notions of truth, and for better or for worse!

The arts can obviously be used for ill, but as George Orwell demonstrated in his own work, they can also be employed in defense of democracy as modes of political thought and action affording opportunities for the revitalization of society through its re-imagining. The Relentless Pursuit of Tone: Timbre in Popular Music assembles a broad spectrum of contemporary perspectives on how "sound" functions in an equally wide array of popular music.

Ranging from the twang of country banjoes and the sheen of hip-hop strings to the crunch of amplified guitars andthe thump of subwoofers on the dance floor, this volume bridges the gap between timbre, our name for the purely acoustic characteristics of sound waves, and tone, an emergent musical construct that straddles the borderline between the perceptual and the political. Essays engage with the entire history of popular music as recorded sound, from the s to the present day, under four large categories.

A National Besteller "Chilling In , Theranos founder and CEO Elizabeth Holmes was widely seen as the female Steve Jobs: a brilliant Stanford dropout whose startup "unicorn" promised to revolutionize the medical industry with a machine that would make blood testing significantly faster and easier. There was just one problem: The technology didn't work. A riveting story of the biggest corporate fraud since Enron, a tale of ambition and hubris set amid the bold promises of Silicon Valley. In The Indispensable Composers, Tommasini offers his own personal guide to the canon - and what greatness really means in classical music.

What does it mean to be canonical now? Who gets to say? And do we have enough perspective on the 20th century to even begin assessing it? Tommasini shares impressions from performances he has heard or given, or moments when his own biography proves revealing. As he argues for his particular pantheon of indispensable composers, Anthony Tommasini provides a masterclass in what to listen for and how to understand what music does to us.

But when asked, Wiesel always said, "I am a teacher first. There, Wiesel challenged his students to explore moral complexity and to resist the dangerous lure of absolutes. In bringing together never-before-recounted moments between Wiesel and his students,Witness serves as a moral education in and of itself--a primer on educating against indifference, on the urgency of memory and individual responsibility, and on the role of literature, music, and art in making the world a more compassionate place.

Burger first met Wiesel at age fifteen; he became his student in his twenties, and his teaching assistant in his thirties. In this profoundly thought-provoking and inspiring book, Burger gives us a front-row seat to Wiesel's remarkable exchanges in and out of the classroom, and chronicles the intimate conversations between these two men over the decades as Burger sought counsel on matters of intellect, spirituality, and faith, while navigating his own personal journey from boyhood to manhood, from student and assistant, to rabbi and, in time, teacher.

Ariel Burger's book is an invitation to every reader to become Wiesel's student, and witness. Wade in the Water by Tracy K. Shortlisted for the T. Smith, the Poet Laureate of the United States Even the men in black armor, the ones Jangling handcuffs and keys, what else Are they so buffered against, if not love's blade Sizing up the heart's familiar meat?

We watch and grieve. We sleep, stir, eat. Love: the heart sliced open, gutted, clean. Love: naked almost in the everlasting street, Skirt lifted by a different kind of breeze. Smith boldly ties America's contemporary moment both to our nation's fraught founding history and to a sense of the spirit, the everlasting.

These are poems of sliding scale: some capture a flicker of song or memory; some collage an array of documents and voices; and some push past the known world into the haunted, the holy. Smith's signature voice--inquisitive, lyrical, and wry--turns over what it means to be a citizen, a mother, and an artist in a culture arbitrated by wealth, men, and violence. Here, private utterance becomes part of a larger choral arrangement as the collection widens to include erasures ofThe Declaration of Independence and the correspondence between slave owners, a found poem comprised of evidence of corporate pollution and accounts of near-death experiences, a sequence of letters written by African Americans enlisted in the Civil War, and the survivors' reports of recent immigrants and refugees.

Wade in the Water is a potent and luminous book by one of America's essential poets. TheSunday Times U. Walker's work is a corrective biography, intended to dispel the many myths and legends that continue to surround Chopin. Fryderyk Chopin is an intimate look into a dramatic life; of particular focus are Chopin's childhood and youth in Poland, which are brought into line with the latest scholarly findings, and Chopin's romantic life with George Sand, with whom he lived for nine years.

Comprehensive and engaging, and written in highly readable prose, the biography wears its scholarship lightly: this is a book suited as much for the professional pianist as it is for the casual music lover. Just as he did in his definitive biography of Liszt, Walker illuminates Chopin and his music with unprecedented clarity in this magisterial biography, bringing to life one of the nineteenth century's most confounding, beloved, and legendary artists.

Matriarchal Societies

Best-selling author Rick Riordan introduces this adventure by Roshani Chokshi about twelve-year-old Aru Shah, who has a tendency to stretch the truth in order to fit in at school. While her classmates are jetting off to family vacations in exotic locales, she'll be spending her autumn break at home, in the Museum of Ancient Indian Art and Culture, waiting for her mom to return from her latest archeological trip. Is it any wonder that Aru makes up stories about being royalty, traveling to Paris, and having a chauffeur?

One day, three schoolmates show up at Aru's doorstep to catch her in a lie. They don't believe her claim that the museum's Lamp of Bharata is cursed, and they dare Aru to prove it. Just a quick light, Aru thinks. Then she can get herself out of this mess and never ever fib again. But lighting the lamp has dire consequences.

She unwittingly frees the Sleeper, an ancient demon whose duty it is to awaken the God of Destruction. Her classmates and beloved mother are frozen in time, and it's up to Aru to save them. The only way to stop the demon is to find the reincarnations of the five legendary Pandava brothers, protagonists of the Hindu epic poem, the Mahabharata, and journey through the Kingdom of Death. But how is one girl in Spider-Man pajamas supposed to do all that? In spite of the double burden of racial and gender discrimination, African-American women have developed a rich intellectual tradition that is not widely known.

In Black Feminist Thought, originally published in , Patricia Hill Collins set out to explore the words and ideas of Black feminist intellectuals and writers, both within the academy and without. Drawing from fiction, poetry, music and oral history, the result is a superbly crafted and revolutionary book that provided the first synthetic overview of Black feminist thought and its canon. Paris, at the dawn of the modern age: Prince Sebastian is looking for a bride--or rather, his parents are looking for one for him.

Sebastian is too busy hiding his secret life from everyone. At night he puts on daring dresses and takes Paris by storm as the fabulous Lady Crystallia--the hottest fashion icon in the world capital of fashion! Sebastian's secret weapon and best friend is the brilliant dressmaker Frances--one of only two people who know the truth: sometimes this boy wears dresses. But Frances dreams of greatness, and being someone's secret weapon means being a secret.

How long can Frances defer her dreams to protect a friend? Jen Wang weaves an exuberantly romantic tale of identity, young love, art, and family. A fairy tale for any age, The Prince and the Dressmaker will steal your heart. This title has Common Core connections. A powerfully moving graphic novel by New York Timesbestselling author Eoin Colfer and the team behind the Artemis Fowl graphic novels that explores the current plight of undocumented immigrants. Ebo is alone. His brother, Kwame, has disappeared, and Ebo knows it can only be to attempt the hazardous journey to Europe, and a better life--the same journey their sister set out on months ago.

But Ebo refuses to be left behind in Ghana. He sets out after Kwame and joins him on the quest to reach Europe. Ebo's epic journey takes him across the Sahara Desert to the dangerous streets of Tripoli, and finally out to the merciless sea. But with every step he holds on to his hope for a new life, and a reunion with his family. As a solitary black bird wings its way through the day, little ones are treated to a magnificent flight from one vibrant color to another.

Inimitable illustrator Steve Light showcases a new style in this board book for the youngest readers. Children can journey with the graceful black bird and its tiny worm friend past orange leaves, through green grass, onto gray rocks, under pink flowers, and more before coming to rest beneath a brilliant blue moon. An instant success in its own time, Daniel Defoe's The Adventures of Robinson Crusoe has for three centuries drawn readers to its archetypal hero, the man surviving alone on an island.

This Companion begins by studying the eighteenth-century literary, historical and cultural contexts of Defoe's novel, exploring the reasons for its immense popularity in Britain and in its colonies in America and in the wider European world. Chapters from leading scholars discuss the social, economic and political dimensions of Crusoe's island story before examining the 'after life' of Robinson Crusoe, from the book's multitudinous translations to its cultural migrations and transformations into other media such as film and television. By considering Defoe's seminal work from a variety of critical perspectives, this book provides a full understanding of the perennial fascination with, and the enduring legacy of, both the book and its iconic hero.

Spirituals performed by jubilee troupes became a sensation in post-Civil War America. First brought to the stage by choral ensembles like the Fisk Jubilee Singers, spirituals anchored a wide range of late nineteenth-century entertainments, including minstrelsy, variety, and plays by both black and white companies. In the first book-length treatment of postbellum spirituals in theatrical entertainments, Sandra Jean Graham mines a trove of resources to chart the spiritual's journey from the private lives of slaves to the concert stage.

Graham navigates the conflicting agendas of those who, in adapting spirituals for their own ends, sold conceptions of racial identity to their patrons. In so doing they lay the foundation for a black entertainment industry whose artistic, financial, and cultural practices extended into the twentieth century. A companion website contains jubilee troupe personnel, recordings, and profiles of 85 jubilee groups.

Chemistry by Choon H. Do Editor ; Attila E. This book discusses the vital role of chemistry in everyday life. It encourages readers to understand how the knowledge of chemistry is important for the development of society and a better future. The text is organized into three parts. Written in an easy-to-understand manner and supplemented by ample number of figures and tables, the book will cater to a broad readership ranging from general readers to experts. Microbiology has undergone radical changes over the past few decades, ushering in an exciting new era in science. In The New Microbiology, Pascale Cossart tells a splendid story about the revolution in microbiology, especially in bacteriology.

This story has wide-ranging implications for human health and medicine, agriculture, environmental science, and our understanding of evolution. The revolution results from the powerful tools of molecular and cellular biology, genomics, and bioinformatics, which have yielded amazing discoveries, from entire genome sequences to video of bacteria invading host cells. This book is for both scientists and especially nonscientists who would like to learn more about the extraordinary world of bacteria.

Cossart's overview of the field of microbiology research, from infectious disease history to the ongoing scientific revolution resulting from CRISPR technologies, is presented in four parts. New concepts in microbiology introduces the world of bacteria and some recent discoveries about how they live, such as the role of regulatory RNAs including riboswitches, the CRISPR defense system, and resistance to antibiotics.

Sociomicrobiology: the social lives of bacteria helps us see the new paradigm by which scientists view bacteria as highly social creatures that communicate in many ways, for example in the assemblies that reside in our intestine or in the environment. The biology of infections reviews some of history's worst epidemics and describes current and emerging infectious diseases, the organisms that cause them, and how they produce an infection.

The New Microbiology takes us on a journey through a remarkable revolution in science that is occurring here and now. Nonviolent Communication by Marshall B. The latest edition of the communication guide that has sold more than 1,, copies An enlightening look at how peaceful communication can create compassionate connections with family, friends, and other acquaintances, this international bestseller uses stories, examples, and sample dialogues to provide solutions to communication problems both at home and in the workplace.

Guidance is provided on identifying and articulating feelings and needs, expressing anger fully, and exploring the power of empathy in order to speak honestly without creating hostility, break patterns of thinking that lead to anger and depression, and communicate compassionately. Practical nonviolent communication skills are partnered with a powerful consciousness and vocabulary that can be applied to personal, professional, and political differences.

Included in the new edition is a complete chapter on conflict resolution and mediation. Can we talk about the news media without proclaiming journalism either our savior or the source of all evil? It is not easy to do so, but it gets easier if we put the problems and prospects of journalism in historical and comparative perspective, view them with a sociological knowledge of how newsmaking operates, and see them in a political context that examines how political institutions shape news as well as how news shapes political attitudes and institutions.

Adopting this approach, Michael Schudson examines news and news institutions in relation to democratic theory and practice, in relation to the economic crisis that affects so many news organizations today and in relation to recent discussions of "fake news. For the public to be swayed from positions people have already staked out, and for government officials to respond to charges that they have behaved corruptly or unconstitutionally or simply rashly and unwisely, the source of information has to come from organizations that hold themselves to the highest standards of verification, fact-checking, and independent and original research, and that is exactly what professional journalism aspires to do.

This timely and important defense of journalism will be of great value to anyone concerned about the future of news and of democracy. Leaves are all around us--in backyards, cascading from window boxes, even emerging from small cracks in city sidewalks given the slightest glint of sunlight.

Perhaps because they are everywhere, it's easy to overlook the humble leaf, but a close look at them provides one of the most enjoyable ways to connect with the natural world. A lush, incredibly informative tribute to the leaf, Nature's Fabric offers an introduction to the science of leaves, weaving biology and chemistry with the history of the deep connection we feel with all things growing and green.

Leaves come in a staggering variety of textures and shapes: they can be smooth or rough, their edges smooth, lobed, or with tiny teeth. They have adapted to their environments in remarkable, often stunningly beautiful ways--from the leaves of carnivorous plants, which have tiny "trigger hairs" that signal the trap to close, to the impressive defense strategies some leaves have evolved to reduce their consumption. Recent studies suggest, for example, that some plants can detect chewing vibrations and mobilize potent chemical defenses.

In many cases, we've learned from the extraordinary adaptations of leaves, such as the invention of new self-cleaning surfaces inspired by the slippery coating found on leaves. But we owe much more to leaves, and Lee also calls our attention back to the fact that that our very lives--and the lives of all on the planet--depend on them. Not only is foliage is the ultimate source of food for every living thing on land, its capacity to cycle carbon dioxide and oxygen can be considered among evolution's most important achievements--and one that is critical in mitigating global climate change.

Taking readers through major topics like these while not losing sight of the small wonders of nature we see every day--if you'd like to identify a favorite leaf, Lee's glossary of leaf characteristics means you won't be left out on a limb--Nature's Fabric is eminently readable and full of intriguing research, sure to enhance your appreciation for these extraordinary green machines.

Knights vs. This heavily illustrated middle grade novel from award-winning author and artist Matt Phelan is a hilarious, rip-roaring tale of derring-do perfect for reluctant readers and fans of How to Train Your Dragon and The Terrible Two. Let me tell you a secret about the Knights of the Round Table: they don't have much to do.

The realm is at peace and dragons are few and far between. Dinosaurs is a highly illustrated, fast-paced adventure full of uproarious knightly hijinks, surprising secrets, and terrifying dinosaurs. With art on nearly every page, including an epic fight scene depicted in several graphic-novel style spreads, this engaging story is Monty Python for young middle school readers. Rather, she's stuck in a tiny apartment with two parents way too lovey--dovey , three sisters way too dramatic , everyone's friends way too often , and a piano which she never gets to practice.

To stand out, she'll need to nail her piano piece at the upcoming city showcase, which means she has to practice through her sisters' hijinks, the neighbors' visits, a family trip to the Dominican Republic. But some new friends and honest conversations help her figure out what truly matters, and know that she can succeed no matter what. You by William B. Irvine Call Number: 2nd Floor Ir84y. What are you? Obviously, you are a person with human ancestors that can be plotted on a family tree, but you have other identities as well.

According to evolutionary biologists, you are a member of the species Homo sapiens and as such have ancestral species that can be plotted on the tree oflife. According to microbiologists, you are a collection of cells, each of which has a cellular ancestry that goes back billions of years.

A geneticist, though, will think of you primarily as a gene-replication machine and might produce a tree that reveals the history of any given gene. And finally,a physicist will give a rather different answer to the identity question: you can best be understood as a collection of atoms, each of which has a very long history. Some have been around since the Big Bang, and others are the result of nuclear fusion that took place within a star. Not only that,but most of your atoms belonged to other living things before joining you. From your atoms' point of view, then, you are just a way station on a multibillion-year-long journey.

You: A Natural History offers a multidisciplinary investigation of your hyperextended family tree, going all the way back to the Big Bang. And while your family tree may contain surprises, your hyperextended history contains some truly amazing stories.

As the result of learning more about who andwhat you are, and about how you came to be here, you will likely see the world around you with fresh eyes. You will also become aware of all the one-off events that had to take place for your existence to be possible: stars had to explode, the earth had to be hit 4. It is difficult, on becoming aware of just how contingent your own existence is, not tofeel very lucky to be part of our universe.

A stunning debut novel set in the late s as an androgynous youth arrives in small-town Minnesota, searching for the mother who abandoned him as a child. On a clear morning in the summer of , Shane Stephenson arrives in Holm, Minnesota, with only a few changes of clothes, an old Nintendo, and a few dollars to his name.

Reeling from the death of his father, Shane wants to find the mother who abandoned him as an adolescent--hoping to reconnect, but also to better understand himself. Against the backdrop of Minnesota's rugged wilderness, and a town littered with shuttered shops, graffiti, and crumbling infrastructure, Holm feels wild and dangerous. Holm's residents, too, are wary of outsiders, and Shane's long blonde hair and androgynous looks draw attention from a violent and bigoted contingent in town, including the unhinged Sven Svenson.

He is drawn in by a group of sympathetic friends in their teens and early twenties, all similarly lost and frequent drug users: the reckless, charming J and his girlfriend Mary; Jenny, a brilliant and beautiful artist who dreams of escaping Holm; and the mysterious loner Russell, with whom Shane, against his better judgment, feels a strange attraction.

As Sven's threats of violence escalate, Shane is forced to choose between his search for his mother, the first true friendships he's ever had, and a desire to leave both his past and present behind entirely. At its core, Northern Lights is the story of a son searching for his mother, and for a connection with her, dealing with issues of abandonment and forgiveness.

But it also addresses the complications, tensions, and dysfunction that can exist in those relationships, presenting an unforgettable world and experience often overlooked, with a new kind of hero to admire. From Nobel Prize-winning economist Jean Tirole, a bold new agenda for the role of economics in society When Jean Tirole won the Nobel Prize in Economics, he suddenly found himself being stopped in the street by complete strangers and asked to comment on issues of the day, no matter how distant from his own areas of research.

His transformation from academic economist to public intellectual prompted him to reflect further on the role economists and their discipline play in society. The result is Economics for the Common Good, a passionate manifesto for a world in which economics, far from being a "dismal science," is a positive force for the common good. Economists are rewarded for writing technical papers in scholarly journals, not joining in public debates. But Tirole says we urgently need economists to engage with the many challenges facing society, helping to identify our key objectives and the tools needed to meet them.

To show how economics can help us realize the common good, Tirole shares his insights on a broad array of questions affecting our everyday lives and the future of our society, including global warming, unemployment, the post global financial order, the euro crisis, the digital revolution, innovation, and the proper balance between the free market and regulation. Providing a rich account of how economics can benefit everyone, Economics for the Common Good sets a new agenda for the role of economics in society. It has a bent bucket seat, bashed tin-can handlebars, and wood-cut wheels -- and riding the patchwork bike that you and your crazy brothers made is the best fun in the whole village.

When you live in a village at the edge of the no-go desert, you need to make your own fun. That's when you and your brothers get inventive and build a bike from scratch, using everyday items like an old milk pot maybe Mum is still using it, maybe not and a used flour sack. You can even make a license plate from bark if you want.

The end result is a spectacular bike, perfect for whooping and laughing as you bumpetty bump over sand hills, past your fed-up mum and right through your mud-for-walls home. A joyous story by multi-award-winning author Maxine Beneba Clarke, beautifully illustrated by street artist Van Thanh Rudd. All That Trash! The narrative is immensely readable A fresh take on a story of old garbage guaranteed to spark conversations and a desire for actions among students.

Highly recommended. Lowell Harrelson wanted to turn trash into methane gas so he rented a barge called Morbo His plan was to ship the garbage from New York to North Carolina, but as the barge floated down the coast, no state would let him dock because of smelly waste on board! The barge became a mockery and the butt of many jokes in the media. What started as an attempted business venture turned into quite the predicament for Mr. Mobro roamed the seas for forty-five days and traveled a distance of 6, miles.

While awaiting its fate, the trash floated in New York's harbor, garnering much attention by onlookers. An important selection for biography and sports collections. This is one biography that will struggle to stay on the shelf. Some say they're two of the greatest athletes of all time. Before they were world famous, they were little girls with big dreams. Venus and Serena Williams. Two peas in a pod. Best friends. Six days a week they awoke before the sun came up to practice their serves and returns, to learn to run faster and hit harder.

They were unstoppable. At age fourteen, Venus played her first professional match. Three years later, it was Serena's turn. It wasn't easy. Some tennis fans cheered for these two fresh faces, while those who were unhappy to see two black girls competing in a nearly all-white sport booed and taunted them. But they didn't let it stop them. Ransome share the inspirational story of two tennis legends who were fierce competitors on the courts, but close sisters above all.

One dark night, Drest's sheltered life on a remote Scottish headland is shattered when invading knights capture her family, but leave Drest behind. Her father, the Mad Wolf of the North, and her beloved brothers are a fearsome war-band, but now Drest is the only one who can save them. So she starts off on a wild rescue attempt, taking a wounded invader along as a hostage. Hunted by a bandit with a dark link to her family's past, aided by a witch whom she rescues from the stake, Drest travels through unwelcoming villages, desolate forests, and haunted towns.

Every time she faces a challenge, her five brothers speak to her in her mind about courage and her role in the war-band. But on her journey, Drest learns that the war-band is legendary for terrorizing the land. If she frees them, they'll not hesitate to hurt the gentle knight who's become her friend.

Drest thought that all she wanted was her family back; now she has to wonder what their freedom would really mean. Is she her father's daughter or is it time to become her own legend? An instant bestseller! By 1 New York Times bestselling author Holly Black, the first book in a stunning new series about a mortal girl who finds herself caught in a web of royal faerie intrigue. Of course I want to be like them. They're beautiful as blades forged in some divine fire. They will live forever.

And Cardan is even more beautiful than the rest. I hate him more than all the others. I hate him so much that sometimes when I look at him, I can hardly breathe. Jude was seven years old when her parents were murdered and she and her two sisters were stolen away to live in the treacherous High Court of Faerie. Ten years later, Jude wants nothing more than to belong there, despite her mortality.

But many of the fey despise humans. Especially Prince Cardan, the youngest and wickedest son of the High King. To win a place at the Court, she must defy him--and face the consequences. In doing so, she becomes embroiled in palace intrigues and deceptions, discovering her own capacity for bloodshed. But as civil war threatens to drown the Courts of Faerie in violence, Jude will need to risk her life in a dangerous alliance to save her sisters, and Faerie itself. Fox the Tiger by Corey R. Tigers are big and fast and sneaky. So he decides to become one! Soon Turtle and Rabbit are joining in the fun.

But will Fox want to be a tiger forever? In Fox the Tiger, this winning trickster character and his animal friends learn that the best thing to be is yourself. House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski Call Number: 1st Floor Years ago, when House of Leaves was first being passed around, it was nothing more than a badly bundled heap of paper, parts of which would occasionally surface on the Internet. No one could have anticipated the small but devoted following this terrifying story would soon command. Starting with an odd assortment of marginalized youth -- musicians, tattoo artists, programmers, strippers, environmentalists, and adrenaline junkies -- the book eventually made its way into the hands of older generations, who not only found themselves in those strangely arranged pages but also discovered a way back into the lives of their estranged children.

Now, for the first time, this astonishing novel is made available in book form, complete with the original colored words, vertical footnotes, and newly added second and third appendices. The story remains unchanged, focusing on a young family that moves into a small home on Ash Tree Lane where they discover something is terribly wrong: their house is bigger on the inside than it is on the outside. Of course, neither Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist Will Navidson nor his companion Karen Green was prepared to face the consequences of that impossibility, until the day their two little children wandered off and their voices eerily began to return another story -- of creature darkness, of an ever-growing abyss behind a closet door, and of that unholy growl which soon enough would tear through their walls and consume all their dreams.

Transitions are marked with primitive signs, such as the visual dimensions of number--a concern that keeps arising as the poems ask how abstractions differ from matter. Light and transparency figure in every poem in this book, while the book as a whole deals with memory as fluid, transitory, illuminating. An illusion. Since its publication in , Rachel Carson's book Silent Spring has often been celebrated as the catalyst that sparked an American environmental movement.

Yet environmental consciousness and environmental protest in some regions of the United States date back to the nineteenth century, with the advent of industrial manufacturing and the consequent growth of cities. As these changes transformed people's lives, ordinary Americans came to recognize the connections between economic exploitation, social inequality, and environmental problems. As the modern age dawned, they turned to labor unions, sportsmen's clubs, racial and ethnic organizations, and community groups to respond to such threats accordingly.

The Myth of Silent Spring tells this story. By challenging the canonical "songbirds and suburbs" interpretation associated with Carson and her work, the book gives readers a more accurate sense of the past and better prepares them for thinking and acting in the present.

And, in case you're wondering, yes, the book is funny. In places, very funny. A remarkable story, magnificently told. Wasson shows why improv deserves to be considered the great American art form of the last half century. For that reason alone, it's a valuable book. It holds the element of surprise--true to the spirit of its subject.

On the night of October 30, , thousands of Americans panicked when they believed that Martians had invaded Earth. What appeared to be breaking news about an alien invasion was in fact a radio drama based on H. Some listeners became angry once they realized they had been tricked, and the reaction to the broadcast sparked a national discussion about fake news, propaganda, and the role of radio. In this compelling nonfiction chapter book, Gail Jarrow explores the production of the broadcast, the aftermath, and the concept of fake news in the media.

Mia Tang has a lot of secrets. Number 1: She lives in a motel, not a big house. Every day, while her immigrant parents clean the rooms, ten-year-old Mia manages the front desk of the Calivista Motel and tends to its guests. Number 2: Her parents hide immigrants. And if the mean motel owner, Mr. Yao, finds out they've been letting them stay in the empty rooms for free, the Tangs will be doomed.

Number 3: She wants to be a writer. But how can she when her mom thinks she should stick to math because English is not her first language? It will take all of Mia's courage, kindness, and hard work to get through this year. Will she be able to hold on to her job, help the immigrants and guests, escape Mr. Yao, and go for her dreams? It all starts when six kids have to meet for a weekly chat--by themselves, with no adults to listen in.

There, in the room they soon dub the ARTT Room short for "A Room to Talk" , they discover it's safe to talk about what's bothering them--everything from Esteban's father's deportation and Haley's father's incarceration to Amari's fears of racial profiling and Ashton's adjustment to his changing family fortunes. When the six are together, they can express the feelings and fears they have to hide from the rest of the world. And together, they can grow braver and more ready for the rest of their lives.

The Book of Boy was awarded a Newbery Honor. With a hump on his back, a mysterious past, and a tendency to talk to animals, he is often mocked by others in his town--until the arrival of a shadowy pilgrim named Secondus. Impressed with Boy's climbing and jumping abilities, Secondus engages Boy as his servant, pulling him into an action-packed and suspenseful expedition across Europe to gather seven precious relics of Saint Peter.

Boy quickly realizes this journey is not an innocent one. They are stealing the relics and accumulating dangerous enemies in the process. But Boy is determined to see this pilgrimage through until the end--for what if St. Peter has the power to make him the same as the other boys? Features a map and black-and-white art by Ian Schoenherr throughout. Friendships are forged, loyalties are tested. Caleb Franklin and his big brother Bobby Gene are excited to have adventures in the woods behind their house.

But Caleb dreams of venturing beyond their ordinary small town. Styx is sixteen and oozes cool. Styx promises the brothers that together, the three of them can pull off the Great Escalator Trade--exchanging one small thing for something better until they achieve their wildest dream. But as the trades get bigger, the brothers soon find themselves in over their heads. Styx has secrets--secrets so big they could ruin everything. Five best of the year lists! Please share. Winner of the Newbery Medal Thoughtful, strong-willed sixth-grader Merci Suarez navigates difficult changes with friends, family, and everyone in between in a resonant new novel from Meg Medina.

Merci Suarez knew that sixth grade would be different, but she had no idea just how different. For starters, Merci has never been like the other kids at her private school in Florida, because she and her older brother, Roli, are scholarship students. They don't have a big house or a fancy boat, and they have to do extra community service to make up for their free tuition. So when bossy Edna Santos sets her sights on the new boy who happens to be Merci's school-assigned Sunshine Buddy, Merci becomes the target of Edna's jealousy.

Things aren't going well at home, either: Merci's grandfather and most trusted ally, Lolo, has been acting strangely lately -- forgetting important things, falling from his bike, and getting angry over nothing. No one in her family will tell Merci what's going on, so she's left to her own worries, while also feeling all on her own at school. In a coming-of-age tale full of humor and wisdom, award-winning author Meg Medina gets to the heart of the confusion and constant change that defines middle school -- and the steadfast connection that defines family.

Armitage Call Number: 3rd Floor From Benjamin Franklin's campaign to combat pollution at the Philadelphia's docks in the s to the movement against climate change today, American environmentalists have sought to protect the natural world and promote a healthy human society. In This Green and Growing Land, historian Kevin Armitage shows how the story of American environmentalism--part philosophy, part social movement--is in no small way a story of America itself, of the way citizens have self-organized, have thought of their communities and their government, and have used their power to protect and enrich the land.

Armitage skillfully analyzes the economic and social forces begetting environmental change and emphasizes the responses of a variety of ordinary Americans--as well as a few well-known leaders--to these complex issues. This concise and engaging survey of more than years of activism tells the story of a magnificent American achievement--and the ongoing problems that environmentalism faces. As Scruton argues in this book, in earlier times, our musical culture had secure foundations in the church, the concert hall and the home; in the ceremonies and celebrations of ordinary life, religion and manners.

Yet we no longer live in that world. Fewer people now play instruments and music is, for many, a form of largely solitary enjoyment. As he shows inMusic as an Art, we live at a critical time for classical music, and this book is an important contribution to the debate, of which we stand in need, concerning the place of music in Western civilization.

Music as an Art begins by examining music through a philosophical lens, engaging in discussions about tonality, music and the moral life, music and cognitive science and German idealism, as well as recalling the author's struggle to encourage his students to distinguish the qualities of good music. Scruton then explains--via erudite chapters on Schubert, Britten, Rameau, opera and film--how we can develop greater judgement in music, recognizing both good taste and bad, establishing musical values, as wellas musical pleasures.

Who is Baby Monkey? He is a baby. He is a monkey. He has a job. He is Baby Monkey, Private Eye! Lost jewels? Missing pizza? Stolen spaceship? Baby Monkey can help Caldecott medalist Brian Selznick and author David Serlin bring Baby Monkey's adventures to life in an exciting new format that blends elements of picture book, beginning reader, and graphic novel. With pithy text and over black and white drawings accented with red, it is ideal for sharing aloud and for emerging readers.

Hooray for Baby Monkey! Tiger vs. Tiger is a lucky kid: She has a monster living under her bed. This monster arrived when Tiger was just a baby. It was supposed to scare her--after all, that's what monsters do. But Tiger was just too cute! Now, Tiger and Monster are best friends. But Monster is a monster, and it needs to scare something.

So every night, Monster stands guard and scares all of Tiger's nightmares away. This arrangement works out perfectly, until a nightmare arrives that's too big and scary for even Monster. Only teamwork and a lot of bravery can chase this nightmare away. Good Rosie! Beloved storyteller Kate DiCamillo and cartoonist Harry Bliss introduce some delightfully doggy dogs in a warm, funny tale of a timid pup who needs a friend. Rosie is a good dog and a faithful companion to her owner, George.

She likes taking walks with George and looking at the clouds together, but the closest she comes to another dog is when she encounters her reflection in her empty dog bowl, and sometimes that makes Rosie feel lonely. One day George takes Rosie to the dog park, but the park is full of dogs that Rosie doesn't know, which makes her feel lonelier than ever. When big, loud Maurice and small, yippy Fifi bound over and want to play, Rosie's not sure how to respond.

Is there a trick to making friends? And if so, can they all figure it out together? See Tweet fly. Fly, Tweet, fly. Pip wants to fly too--flap, flap, flap! Can Otto help Pip find a way to soar in the sky? This Pre-level 1 Ready-to-Read with bright illustrations and minimal text is perfect for the true emergent reader. I couldn't go to their schools. I couldn't drink from their water fountains. There were so many things I couldn't do. Martin Luther King Jr. They protested the laws that kept black people separate from white people.

When a young boy visits his grandfather, their lack of a common language leads to confusion, frustration, and silence. But as they sit down to draw together, something magical happens - with a shared love of art and storytelling, the two form a bond that goes beyond words. A young Muslim girl spends a busy day wrapped up in her mother's colorful headscarf in this sweet and fanciful picture book from debut author and illustrator Jamilah Tompkins-Bigelow and Ebony Glenn.

A khimar is a flowing scarf that my mommy wears. Before she walks out the door each day, she wraps one around her head. A young girl plays dress up with her mother's headscarves, feeling her mother's love with every one she tries on. Charming and vibrant illustrations showcase the beauty of the diverse and welcoming community in this portrait of a young Muslim American girl's life.

Every kid in Lola's school was from somewhere else. Hers was a school of faraway places. So when Lola's teacher asks the students to draw a picture of where their families immigrated from, all the kids are excited. Except Lola. She can't remember The Island--she left when she was just a baby. But with the help of her family and friends, and their memories--joyous, fantastical, heartbreaking, and frightening--Lola's imagination takes her on an extraordinary journey back to The Island.

I thought maybe it happens to some of you, too, so I opened a thread for it. There are 2 connected books I want to read again, but I can't remember their titles or author. One was about a woman who ran an inn in a former bordello, who impulsively married a man 10 years before who comes back to their hometown and doesn't know they're still married The father forces him to marry her I remember a robotic dog in the story, too. Does anyone know the names of the author or the books?

The first one sounds familiar, but I don't know. The robotic dog thing threw me off a little. They were contemporary. The dog was a security program in action. I remember his first name. It was Bram. Thanks for your help! I must have missed this thread. But, I win, I win! Do I get a prize? CC, Have fun re-reading! OH Jeeez, I read the books myself and absolutely didn't think of them. It's a Harlequin Presents from back in the late 70's or early 80's. She is an actress with a bad temper who gets thrown off a set and has nowhere to go. He owns a place in Texas? She takes too long getting ready in the mornings so he asks what all her bottles and cosmetics are for then throws away everything but the basics.

She throws a complete fit. It's been decades since I've read a Harlequin, but I'd love to find this one. I've read many HP's, but that one doesn't sound familiar sorry, Morphidae. I'm also looking for a Harlequin Presents circa ' It's about a secretary forgot her name and her new boss who is the milionaire that takes over her company.

I think his name is either Luke or Jake Fosythe. Her parents are dead so she raised her younger brother Stevie. Stevie is out of control and gets arrested for stealing a car. Fosythe suddenly shows up at the courthouse and convinces the judge to release Stevie under his care. The judge agrees and Fosythe takes the secretary and Stevie to his house.

Then he takes the secty to dinner and takes her out to the dance floor so that the paparazzi take pictures of them dancing. The secretary overhears dulcie in a high-end boutique talking smack, and she leaves Fosythe. Meanwhile, stevie is working on the secty's car but he wasn't finished with the brakes, and she takes it, and gets into a car accident. Sound familiar anyone? HI Suge, sorry I checked my books between ' I remember at least a similar storyline but am not quite sure.

So if I have read it, it must have been from the library. They just had HP's in the newer '90 design without the fine golden Line at the top. So my guess would be something between no. The setting in the book I read was England, is that correct? Suge, I have googled and googled, and can't find the book you're talking about I know! I've googled and did everything I could think of CC and came up blank. The book was set in Britain, those are always my favorite, because its like traveling for cheap.

Julia, girlfriend, I am sooo confused! Fosythe might just have an R in it! Finding old books is hard work, especially with a monthly series like Harlequin. Have you seen the site www. If you can't find anything else, maybe one of those titles might ring a bell? And good luck! Okay, I have a "Name that Book" for you all. Something about the hero saving the heroine and her newborn baby who are stranded in the snow? It's one I swear I came across in this forum and thought I had read it before, but decided I'd go back to it and check later, only now I can't find it.

I would say I read the description of it either in this forum, or in something linked from this forum. It was a short story written by Linda Howard called Bluebird Winter. Thanks, bookbeat! That's it, and now I see that another book I was thinking of was Sarah's Child , which is slightly connected to Bluebird Winter.

It is? I didn't know that! Sarah's Child is one of my favorites. I'm going to have to go look for Bluebird Winter now! Apparently Almost Forever is slightly connected too, although I'm not sure how. The hero in Bluebird appears younger in Sarah's Child though according to an Amazon review. Is it the young neighbor who lived next door with his Mom and helped Sarah in the store?

I can't remember his name, Derek maybe? I am looking for a book I read before I don't know the title or author. It is set in England near the Thames. In the beginning the heroine is a highwayman dressed as a boy and is in charge of a group of orphaned boys. She tries to rob a nobleman and he captures her and takes her to his home to be punished.

When they go to spank her they figure out she is a she and he decides to keep her and train her to be a lady. In the end she ends up being or looking like someone important that they were looking for all along. Some other random things: I think she had her first "tub" bath and compared it to bathing in the Thames. I believe she had long red hair. I have read all the possible ones. I would love to find this book. I have been looking for more than 3 years now!

Any help would be great! Hi winnie, welcome to the group! Thanks Julia, but I don't think either of these are it by the descriptions. I looked at the description and I don't think that it is the book I am looking for. Looks like it is along the same lines though. I'll get it and read it just to be sure.

Any more ideas? Winnie, can you remember anything else about the book? Anything at all? Yeah I read Captain Jack's Woman not too long ago and that doesn't sound like a match. Winnie: wish I could help ya, but I don't know the book you're looking for. It sounds like a good read, though, so I'll be watching this thread to see what you find out. Good luck! CC, Let's see I read it when I was a teen so it was from sometime before about The robbery starts from like the the first page.

She was young and virginal. He was maybe ish. Set in the regency era I believe. Sorry I don't remember anything else right now. Maybe someone here will remember this one: I read it in college, so it would have been published pre or so. It's a historical romance set in the crusades time period in England. The heroine has a brother I think maybe he's the one who ends up becoming friar tuck. The hero who is a knight of some sort and the heroine travel across country with her brother and some other people as a group.

They're going to save some girl I think maybe, who turns out to be blind? I do remember that there's a bar brawl scene at one point. Sorry so vague, but it's been a long time since I read it. I remember really liking it though and I'd like to re-read it and maybe see if the author has written anything else.

I dont remember if the woman was an actress. But she was a beautiful woman who got stranded and a rancher gave her a job. I "borrowed" a book trilogy from my Grandpa who loved to read romance novels! He can't see well enough now about 15 years ago that took place in the American colonies and some islands in the Gulf of Mexico that were used by pirates. There was a hurricane in one where the heroine lost her memory and was rescued by a Spanish galleon and was on the verge of marrying a Spanish noble when her memory came back and her pirate husband rescued her before they both were executed.

She was courted by at least one other pirate, maybe Jean LaFitte? I think in the 3rd book they retired and settled down on his estate in the Carolinas or Virginia under his real name. Classic bodice-rippers all three, but I thought they were wonderful at the time and reread them at least once, maybe twice. I remembered the author!!!

Valerie Sherwood I was slicing up potatoes for beef stew and it just popped into my head! The books were Nightsong , Windsong , and Lovesong. Not necessarily in that order. This is an add on to my message I still think it was one of Janet Dailey's State books, but it might have been the one about Utah. Land Of Enchantment was set in New Mexico. Katybear, Check out this page, which lists books that touch on the Robin Hood legend and characters. Many of those listed are romances.

The story opens on Elyse overseeing the wedding preparation of her cousin female. During the ceremony she slips away to the bridal chambers to make sure every thing is everything where she is kidnapped by Max and his cronies. Any suggestions to the title and author would be really appreciated, I am longing to re-read this story. Dainty, that sounds an awful lot like Jude Devereaux 's Velvet Angel. The hero's name was Miles, though, and the heroine's was Elizabeth. He kidnapped her by mistake in a rolled up carpet.

I read it not too long ago. They end up in the north wintering over in a castle and getting involved with some bad guys from the hansiatic league. I was thinking it was set in the Elizabethan era, though. It's one of Woodiwiss' best, in my opinion. Wasn't the heroine in that one also rolled up in a carpet? Thanks a million, katybear. You guys are the best. But Knight in Shining Armor is awesome! Dainty - Glad to help! I'm not nearly as well-read romance-wise as most of the people here, so I confess I was absurdly excited when I recognized the book!

Don't you just love those tried n true plot devices? I got three books that I need help finding one is driving me "bonkers" 'cause I didn't like it the first time around, but message 21 sounds like it and I thought I knew the name, and the more I try to remember ahh I don't remember the author. He's a utter bastard, but considering that his little daughter screams evertime he comes near her that would make anyone mad at the world.

They met on a ship, the hero having a hard time comforting his travel-worn daughter, and the heroine who happen to be a spy for her side is carrying some priceless porcelain doll which she kindly lends the child. Somehow losses sight of them in the crowd and has to track down the guy, the child and the doll, because the doll has a secret compartment with vital info need by her side. I think the guy was also a spy for his side too. She did find them and had to pose as a nanny for hire so that she can steal the doll back before its secrets are discovered. The Duke is dead and his brother plots to do away with the new born heiress and assume the title.

The dying duchess is aware of the plot and after the delivery of her daughter she details the plot in a letter which she places in the spine of her bible and on her the last of her dying strength she takes the newborn, warms the family seal and brands the child on her "butt". Child escape death as the henceman kind of a Finnegan character the villain used decided to raise the child as his own so one day he can claim the title thru the child.

She's raised as a pickpocket and on her first time out she gets caught by the hero who likens her appearance to one of their ilk. Hi Everyone! Actually found the title right one, silly me and the author of book 1. It's called Loving Julia by Karen Robards which was suggested to me on talk forum at www. I usually like time travel stories too. It appears to be a book that generates a lot of divided opinion. A lot of people really like it, but an equal number seem to hate it. I'm looking for two books: 1 is a gothic romance, and I only remember a few details. First, it was by an author I wasn't familiar with, and had a black cover with no people on it.

I know that the hero accused the heroine of being a witch, which she denied, but after they slept together, he made note that she had two "witches marks" that were birthmarks above her pubic line. Also, she was clueless about sex, and asked the hero what "fellate me" meant because she overheard another man say it to a woman I remember he had to teach her all about sex, and she was so afraid of it, that he tied himself up for her so she wouldn't have to fear being overpowered.

I remember she wore a jean skirt with buttons all the way to the floor, and they had sex on a kitchen table. Thanks, Ireland. Now if I could only get relief from the 3RD. This one I found on another site and it sounds so good, I would like to read it Ring any bells? Message 43 O. I know this is kind of late but I just read your 3 as part of my search - I am still looking for the book above in post I see you found it.

Hi Winnie, Whisper to Me of Love isn't your book of 21? I could have sworn that your book was solved in another thread Anyho, here's an overview for Whisper to Me of Love by Shirlee Busbee A whisper of Passion She was a raven-haired waif from the streets of london - a wild innocent to be rescued A spirited beauty she would captivate Royce Manchester's jaded heart-while resisting the smoldering desire she felt for her virile protector. When fate hurls them together in , their lives are changed forever. A whisper of Danger In Royce's glittering world of money and privilege, young Morgana discovered the shocking sercret of her true identity- entangling the wealthy American planter in a deadly skein of aristocratic family intrugue.

But grave evil would only feed the flames of love that knew no bounds and glorious rapture that would not be denied. Hope you find your story. She's supposed to be watching this one guy and there is a scene with him where he is giving her a massage with oil etc. I got it at this used book sale these old ladies in my neighborhood had in their garage but after i read my grandma took and i never saw it again. Here's another one. This book is called something like Second Chance or something to that effect. It's about this deaf woman a scientist who dies getting hit by a car while crossing a street after work.

She goes to a "heaven" like place where this apparent angel tells her she wasn't supposed to die so she gets another chance. She ends up in the pass in the body of this woman who was in a coma maybe? It ends happily ever after with her wining back the husbands love And one more kind of similar to the last one. Starts out with this car crash scene.

Woman in car crash hits her head apparently and can't remember anything of who she is. Her husband finds her but she doesn't recognize him and passes out and into a coma. She wakes has no idea about anything, doesn't even recognize her own face. She goes home and the reader gradually finds out that she was not a nice person but since she can't remember She lives in a huge house with her husband and these apparently French siblings who work for her and her husband.

Anyways she kind of starts to remember, makes up with her husband Who does end of rescuing her. So there are my vague summaries of books i read at one type and can't remember. I've been looking for these forever it seems like cuz they were really good Help! Do you all know about Byron? The last one sounds a little like a Theresa Charles book which was published as both Dark Legacy and Happy now I go, neither of which touchstone. I love this book. I don't think it's that one since I remember it being more contemporary then that It was republished in the 80s, but it was very much set in WW2.

Although since it was written during WW2 orignally the "feel" is more contemporary. Sort of. But the French part is not it. A woman wakes up in the hospital in France after a car crash. She has amnesia and doesn't recognize the man who claims to be her husband. He lives in a castle with his mother and sister -- and they have a daughter she doesn't remember either. Eventually it turns out to be a case of mistaken identity. Too bad no one else recognizes my first one!


  • The Last One Standing.
  • Top Navigation?
  • Fabula Saltica.
  • Legacy of the Heart: Writing Your Own Spiritual Will.
  • Coming Out 3.
  • Suffolk surnames (1861).

It sounds interesting. I just added it to the Romantic Times Book Sleuth discussion thread, though. Winnie, I don't see a post that you found your book 21 yet. Could it be Love's Charade by Jane Feather? Oh, this is so exciting! The book I'm looking for is a totally trashy romance my cousin and I read for the sex scenes when we were younger. It involved this guy who was a teacher or a professor and had bright red hair. Anyway, he had sex with a bunch of girls, and they all came back to this reunion with batches of redhaired children It was cheesy, but I remember it so vividly and wish I could find it again!

Anybody recognize it? No sorry. But welcome to the group superblondgirl! Jenson, According to the people on the Romantic Times Message Boards, my book 2 up there is Fantasy by Lori Foster , which they say was originally published as part of a series romance and then repubed after she got famous. I've got it bookmooched now, but I haven't received it yet, so I'll let you know when I get it in. Ireland, I have Foster's Fantasy, but I didn't recognize it from the bits you remembered. Here's the blurb from the back cover: Security consultant Sebastian Sinclair agrees to be sold at a bachelor auction.

Being bought is one thing, now he's about to be given away as a gift for some lucky birthday girl. But one look at Brandi Sommers and Sebastian can't wait to be unwrapped. Brandi really means it when she says "Oh, you shouldn't have" to her sister's outrageous birthday gift, a five-day dream vacation to a lovers' retreat.

Lover included. What's she going to do in paradise with the sexy stranger Sebastrian Sinclair? Brandi soon discovers she can do whatever she wants. I remember this one now. If you like Fantasy, and you haven't read the other Visitation books, you should. They are all fabulous! I hope someone can tell me what this book is.

About this book

I read it years ago, from the library, and could never figure out what the book was after I sent it back. I don't know names either. All I remember was that the lady was going on vacation in either scotland or england. She was staying in a type of lodge or log cabin. There was something magical that appeared, some type of God or Faery.

They fell in love.

Navigation menu

It was forbidden for him to love someone, so he was sent back to no-where land before a council to get his fate judged. She went home and balled her eyes out. She told her sister or someone close to her about him, and the person was convinced that it was all a dream, that she had from the plot of a book she was reading. She convinced herself of that too. Then months later he moves in across the street from her, and thats the end of the book. I keep thinking that he begged the councel to send him back as a person so they could have a life together.

BUT I have a very active imagination, so I don't know if that was in there or if I just dreamed it up myself when the book was done with. Thanks :D. The Secret Life of Bryan was one of my faves of the visitation series. I'll have to check out fantasy, it sounds good. Ireland, it will be interesting to see if they got the right book. CrazyDaisyLou - It kind of sounds like a short story I read in Man of My Dreams which was an anthology except the ending it much, much different. In this short story the heroine is a librarian who discovers her former lover at a solstace celebration.

He left her because he had been taken by the fairies and was the consort of the fairy queen. It's probably not the same one but I thought I'd mention it. It does sound like a very good story, hope you figure out what it is. There is a Johanna Lindsey with a plot like this. The heroine is named Rosalind or something like that and is a medieval history professor.

She collects swords and bought one that was cursed and brought forth Thor, a Viking warrior. They fall in love and travel through time, and the only way to break the curse is if she voluntarily gives him the sword back, which she does to free him, but it send them back to their respective times. Her brother and best friend both tell her she's been sick and it's been a dream or some such thing and at the end Thor does appear in her time as a modern man, having appealed to Odin in Valhalla to give him a second chance at life.

I think it was called Until Forever or something like that. Her name is Roseleen, but other than that you are on the mark gracer. It is called Until Forever. I don't usually read contemporaries, but I remember reading one when I was younger that I would like to find again. It was written in the 80s and followed the romantic lives of music prodigies who meet at school as teenagers. It followed them into adulthood and was an old school 80s epic.

The main character is a virtuoso girl who is considerably younger than the others who has a serious case of unrequited love for the big man on campus. He de-flowers her an expression one never uses outside of a romance novel and then walks out on her. They wind up getting together years later and she of course has only ever had sex once with him as a teenager because who knows.

They also have a male friend who is involved in some weird bi-threesome plot where he refers to some sex act as being as romantic as "changing a light bulb. Thanks so much Gracer and LucyMaude. I hope this is it, it sounds like it is. I'm surprised I don't have it, considering I've collected 25 Johanna Lindsey novels so far. But I'm 25, and it's been at least 9 years since I read it, and I didn't even actually own any books back then.

I am SO going out tomorrow to look for it. Remember Me there are 3 of them. I am still looking for the book in message Here is the description from bn. Synopsis Eyes snapping emerald fire, Isabeau DeBurgh alias the Devil's Flame-sat motionless upon her fine black stallion.

The most feared and notorious highwayman of them all was about to strike Publishers Weekly Readers who don't put a premium on originality may find this fast-paced tale of s England amusing, with its masterful hero and spunky heroine. Isabeau DeBurgh, a beautiful woman with a hot temper and a vocabulary to match, earns a living at what she does best--highway robbery. But the night she tries to rob Lord Griffin Stone, an aristocratic black sheep just back from America, her luck runs out; he wounds her in a sword fight. Griffin won't turn Isabeau over to the authorities who might hang her nor turn her loose to steal, so he decides to take her home, dress her up and teach her the finer points of etiquette.

Meanwhile Isabeau develops a soft spot in her heart for Griffin, as he does for her. And why not? Compared to the rest of the crew, a mere thief looks pretty attractive. Winniekuhl, I think I have solved the mystery of I knew it sounded familiar, I just had a hard time coming up with the name. It is Birdie by Taylor Ryan. It is a Harlequin Historical published in Actually, a copy is being sold on ebay right now if you want to look at it. I probably shouldn't be so confident. After all I could be wrong. But I hope I'm not. Let me know if I got it. Thanks megkrahl, I read the desciption and it is not it.

Thanks for trying!

Angela Bassett - Wikipedia

Hi Winnie, i thought it might be The Rogue and the Hellion by Connie Mason as she is a highwayman, but found out to be a girl, he takes her back to teach her a lesson but she turns out to be a lady! But then i realised it wasn't published until , might have been re-released, but i thought it was worth a mention just incase Hope you find what yr looking for! Her flirtatious sister, Daphne, is engaged to a man who will only inherit if he is married by a certain date.

Daphne elopes, leaving behind a note and her wedding dress. Sophie shows up at the altar, but Alex, the bridegroom, recognizes her for who she is. They agree to marry to allow him to inherit and her to save face for her sister. It does sound familiar, but I am at a loss as well. The names of the sisters are different, but the plot sounds very similar.

In the Bradley story, the sisters are twins. Could be it. I found a description: Lovely Sophia Forest was a very intellectual young lady for the year in Regency England--quite different from her beautiful and flighty sister, Daphne. All London was agog when Sophia rather than Daphne wed the dashing Earl of Gresham, whose scorn for bookish females was well-known.

The marriage was intended as a business arrangement only--to preserve the Earl's fortune and give Sophia financial independence. But what was Sophia to do when she found herself enamoured of her husband, though too proud to admit it? Sophia needed all her wit and womanly wiles in a game of pretense and passion, to make the man she loved, love her. We'll see if it's the right one. It's original copyright date was Hello, I was wondering if anyone could help me find the names of two books I read some years ago.

I believe they were published around always before August I believe they are from British authors. They are both romances. One has a yellow cover with little cakes or cupcakes - I don't recall on them. She shares her house with some friends. The book is really funny. The other one has a light blue cover and I don't remember the story that well. I do know that in the end, the guy gives the girl a unique rose that he himself well, his company I guess created by matching 2 types of roses.

In this last one, I just remembered that in the beginning, the girl is trying some clothes in a shop and afraid of a bee runs topless through the shop and bumps into the guy. Well, I know it's not much, but if anyone could help, I'd be very grateful. Thank you very much. I love that you guys have this section. New here, so please bear with me. I also think she had a girlfriend who runs a local bookshop.

I know it isn't much to go on, but every time I think I may be remembering more of the story I start to think I'm combining two stories into one. It's driving me batty. Nyah99 -- yellow cover with possible cupcakes reminds me of He Loves Lucy by Susan Donovan , but I'm not sure that's your book. This one takes place in Miami? The heroine has a goal to lose weight for publicity with the hero being her trainer. Not one of the Bridgertons I'll dig around a bit and see if I can come up with a title.

Thank you so much both of you. Thank you again. Thank you for your help. I've just found the name of the other book. First of all, its cover is not blue, but white. Aviddiva- Thanks. It could be Amanda Quick, though I still can't seem to place it. And it seems like she has several with trading places type themes. I'll keep digging thru her stuff and see, though I appreciate you still looking as well. The Duke's grandfather corresponds with the heroine and carries on the courtship. Grandpa dies and when grandson comes back from the war, he finds out he is engaged to her.

Grandson goes to confront her, she thinks he is the new footman she has hired and the story then continues. It's pretty funny actually. Hope this helps. In that book, the hero is disguised as the heroine's butler. He is a spy and the powers that be believe that her deceased husband had something of importance he was a spy too.

There is also a Julia Quinn where the hero shows up and pretends to be her estate manager or something similar. She's the impoverished daughter of an earl or something similar who is working as a paid companion to a crotchety old lady who's nephew is a Marquis posing as her estate manager to get to the bottom of who is blackmailing her.

Very funny and entertaining! Thanks guys. Oddly, I have missed all of those and will now be reading those to see if maybe I've just lost my entire peas sized brain and maybe DID actually read one of those. Hopefully it'll come to me soon as it's still tickling the back of my mind constantly. Very sad I tell you.

Thanks again! I'm pretty sure its a historical romance but all i remember is that the hero if the book is sold at an auction. He is bought by a woman for her daughter. I don't remember the name or the author of the book. I have a vague memory of one like that as well, but can't quite place it. I need some help with a book title too, It's a historical romance and the lady poses as a highwayman to take cre of the estate. The lady also posed as an ugly crone on the night their supposed meeting. Not quite sure this fits the bill but My Lady Notorius by Jo Beverley has a highwayman heroine with a cruel father and brother.

She is trying to protect her widowed sister and baby who the father is trying to marry off to some awful man. The book is part of the Malloren series and takes place in Georgian England. The one you describe sounds familiar too but so far it's escaping me! Hi everyone!

Here goes nothing I'm looking for a book that's been bugging me for about a month now. I don't know the title or author or character names. I think the "hero" is from a well-known, well-off family. I know the "heroine" is from a poor family. She has red hair. I'm not sure if she has an older brother or dad. I remember the first chapter or so clearly, but not sure if the rest when they're older is correct or from another story. I think the two sisters were off to the store I think the sister was hitting on the guy Sadly, that's all I remember. I keep thinking Linda Howard, but I just don't know Thank-you for any help you guys can give.

I will try my best to do the same. Thank you again! It is! Thank-you so much! I cannot believe how I could have overlooked that! I had a feeling it might've been Linda Howard Thank-you again! Hi Suge, I tried to read all the threads and it doesn't look as if anyone had named your book, but I have the answer! It was one of the first romance novels I ever owned and one I go back to and reread every now and then! Hi, all--I'm trying to find a certain book. It was out in paperback before probably well before that. The setting is definitely 19th century or earlier nobility, etc. I remember two main things about it: earlier on, there's a scene where the heroine is in the library with the hero moonlight, filmy nightgown, lots of sexual tension ; later, he kidnaps her and they're in an inn--very steamy sex then.

If any of you can help, it would be much appreciated! Isisreads, if you reverse the order of the scenes with the library later than the inn , there are two scenes very similar to what you've described in Judith Ivory 's Untie My Heart. It's my least favourite Ivory book but lots of other people absolutely love it. Of course, an inn and a library are kind of popular settings for historical romance, so any other details you can supply might help readers here pinpoint the book you're looking for.

I'm looking for a book I read around 5 or 6 years ago so let's say for starters that I picked up at a book sale at the local library. So it had probably been around for a while before that. The setting of the novel is I believe in a sort of system similar to 19th or 18th century England where there were still nobles around that controlled estates and whatnot. Additionally, fine carriages and at least unsophisticated firearms were around too if I remember correctly. The plot revolves around a heroine named Kate or something similar - I want to say her full name was Kathleen or Katherine or something along those lines who has gotten stuck with running the family estate because her brother, who should be in charge, is incompetent and doesn't really do anything.

At the same time she's riding around in dark clothes on a black horse, holding up stagecoaches for some odd reason. It had to do with the family honor - I want to say she was looking to catch smugglers or something along those lines? Don't remember too well. But she's holding up these coaches looking for something. Now a gentleman from somewhere else visits the estate for a bit for some reason or another and love begins to spark between him and Kate don't remember his name, sorry.

He begins to deduce that she's the highwayman in question and follows her one night when she makes a run. Things go wrong on this trip and she gets shot by a guy in the carriage but the gentleman saves her and brings her back to her home. He then covers for her in order to make sure no one else found out about her double life. Near the end of the story Kate finds that some of her brother's friends one creepy guy in particular who keeps on hitting on her are performing some criminal activity on the family land.

She gets captured and the gentleman goes to save her, killing the ringleader in a duel. So yeah sorry there aren't too many specific details but that's what I remember from the book. Hope someone can help me find it - even a couple of general titles that might fit the profile would help! Gasharko, I don't know the name of the book you seek although it sounds tantalizingly familiar but this list of "highwayman" themed regencies, which includes stories with women in male bandit disguise, might help you find what you're looking for: Highwaymen themed romances at The Nonesuch.

Hello from Australia — I am searching for a book — unknown title or author The other central character is the dashing pirate who attempts to seduce and control her. Cheers from Aus, Tan. I need some help to name a book. I know the book was a Harlequin Presents I want to say around or later about a married guy who was dating another younger woman. She stops the affair and he tries to convince her not to. He worked for father-in-law. The man's wife was a paralytic, and at the end of the book, she leaves the husband for her nurse? If anybody could remember the title, I would appreciate.

It has been bothering me about remembering the title. Hi Guys, I am new to this group, and I was hoping to get some help finding a book i read around It is basically about a temporary housekeeper or a helper who is 8 months pregnant, and you later find out that she is a virgin. The owner of the house who is a businessman, ends up falling in love with her.

I think in the scene that she tells the hero that she is a virgin is where she is getting made fun off by local boys, as she is young and seen as easy because she winds up pregnant. She is actually a surrogate for her sister and her husband, but both die in an accident leaving her alone. To take care of herself and the child, she gets this temp job. I believe she is Italian. He also helps her give birth to the child in his house, which i think is a girl. The last scene is of them getting married, and she is walking down the aisle, looking at the baby and thinking about everything.

I have been trying to recall this book for a long time but as it is one of the first ones I read, I don't remember more about it. I have looked through many book lists and themed lists to find it including all romance writers, romancewiki, and fictiondb. I would really appreciate any help i get. I think the heroine has never been rich, and I am positive the setting is in the U. But thanks anyways. Let me know if any others come to your mind. Maybe this one? Myles Wellington still grieved over the loss of his young wife, but when he learned that her sister, Faith, was carrying his child, he felt the stirrings of life inside he'd believed he'd never feel again!

Faith had secretly agreed to help her sister give her husband this last gift, but she had her own reasons for wanting this child, wanting to give Myles something no one else could. She'd loved him for so long, had been so alone - until Myles insisted she live with him How could she share the same house with the man whose touch set her soul on fire, yet how could she resist grabbing at the chance fate had given her to have the only man she'd ever loved?. Myles wanted this child, but he was shocked to discover he wanted Faith even more.

Exulting in the intense desires she aroused in him to protect, to possess, Myles struggled to break free of the past. Could they put to rest their memories of the woman they'd both loved and build a future together? Sounds like the kind of plots they have. It could be presents, romance, or american romance. I just came across a special edition silhouette called An abundance of babies by Marie Ferrarella but it isnt the one, which is very similar!

I am almost starting to feel like the book doesnt exist. Any of you feel that way while looking for a book? I was searching through vintageromances. You said you read the book in the early 's so I've only been looking for books in that time frame, but could it also have been published in the 's? Also, is there anything you remember about the cover, such as color maybe? It is possible it was published in the late 90s. I was thinking the cover had yellow and blue on it Pregnant female butler 8-months along. The book summary doesn't mention surrogacy, but the term did show up two times when I searched for that term in Google Books.

XD The heroine is a surrogate for her aunt and uncle though. This is it!!! Yea I had a feeling the summary wouldn't mention surrogacy, but I was wrong about the sister and husband. Thank you so much! Once i saw the cover, I realized I have seen it before. Let me know if you need help finding a book, I'll be sure to return the favour. Hi guys i'am so glad to have found this place I have been looking for this Victorian romance about the hero being engaged since he was young by his father.

He falls in love with his newfound bride and so does she. But she tries to be more of a lady and so his best friend teaches her how to act in society while our hero is on a trip The sister in law is in a wheel chair and is trying to get rid of the heroine and also there are snipets of their past lives Sorry if it sounds confusing but I' ve been looking for this book forever! My name is Florecer and I am a new member of this group. First let me answer the question of Nyah99, the post number 84 about the last novel: the description sounds like "The Shocking Lord Standon" by Louise Allen, and is part of the Revenhurst Saga.

Here a leave the book description. He cannot honorably deny them, but he won't be forced into marriage.

Best books of 2016 – part one

Encountering a respectable governess in scandalizing circumstances, Gareth demands her help—to make him entirely ineligible. He educates the buttoned-up Miss Jessica Gifford in the courtesan's arts. But Gareth hasn't bargained on such an ardent, clever pupil—or on his passionate response to her! He wanted to cause a stir—it seems they are about to brew a scandal! The list the list in the correct order is: 1. Ravenhurst 6. Hurst 7. Now is my turn to have a question. I am looking for a book whose name and author I can not remember. The plot was somthing like this: two sisters twins are abducted by a bandit.

This man promises to free one of the sisters if the other promises to stay with him. One of them grants the motion and gradually discovers that the villain has a noble heart. I read the description when I was looking for other books to read, but never wrote down the data of this book to read next. If any of you could tell me the name of the book or author, I am very grateful for your help.